As U.S. troops help Iraqi armed forces in their offensive against ISIS militants, Massachusetts Congressman Seth Moulton recently made a recent fact-finding visit to Iraq and returned to Washington arguing that the United States should broaden and energize its efforts in the country. Moulton-a member of the House Armed Services Committee and a former Marine infantry officer in Iraq-has urged a broader U.S. policy of support for political reforms and political rapprochement among Iraq's communal factions. USIP hosted a discussion with Congressman Moulton and USIP President Nancy Lindborg on Iraq, ISIS and the broader Middle East.

seth moulton

After months of reviewing U.S. policies in Iraq, Congressman Moulton wrote in a June 2016  opinion piece in The Washington Post that U.S. policies "have yet to articulate a political plan to ensure Iraq's long-term stability." The congressman, who represents northeastern Massachusetts' Sixth District, released a set of recommendations that he argues are critical to defeating ISIS and helping stabilize the Middle East in September at a public event at USIP. He has urged greater support U.S. support for political reforms by the government of Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, and more intensive diplomacy to push for unity among Iraq's main communal factions: Sunni and Shia Muslims, and ethnic Kurds. In a conversation at USIP, the congressman discussed his findings and recommendations with USIP President Lindborg and members of the audience. Continue the conversation on Twitter with #IraqPlan.

Speakers

Congressman Seth Moulton (D-MA)
6th Congressional District of Massachusetts, U.S. House of Representatives

Nancy Lindborg, Moderator
President, United States Institute of Peace 

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