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USIP hosted a discussion on cutting-edge research initiatives to prevent and mitigate sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict settings.

Read the event analysis, Ending Sexual Violence in Conflict? First, Understanding It

The U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP), Women in International Security (WIIS), the Human Rights Center at University of California-Berkley and Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO) hosted the Missing Peace Initiative Young Scholars for a panel event on May 23, 2014 from 9:30 to 11:00am at USIP. The Young Scholars Network is an extension of the Missing Peace Initiative, and brings together a global community of scholars currently researching innovative methodologies to address the prevention of sexual violence in conflict.

In support of the British Government’s June 2014 Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict this event examined the current research initiatives to end sexual violence in conflict and offer important insights from pioneering studies conducted by members of the Missing Peace Young Scholars Network.

The panel offered an opportunity for international policy and academic communities to identify challenges and gaps in preventing and mitigating sexual and gender-based violence worldwide. The outcomes of the two-day workshop and public event were forwarded to the co-chairs of the London Summit, UK Foreign Secretary William Hague and Ms. Angelina Jolie, Special Envoy for the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees.

Additional Resources

Further Readings

This event featured the following speakers:

Members of the Young Scholars Network

  • Renata Avelar Giannini
    Research Associate, Igarapé Institute, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Amelia Hoover Green
    Assistant Professor, Drexel University, Pennsylvania, USA
  • Sabrina Karim
    Ph.D. Candidate, Emory University, Georgia, USA
  • Paul Kirby
    Lecturer, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK
  • Jocelyn Kelly
    Ph.D. Candidate, Johns Hopkins University, Maryland, USA
  • Michele Leiby
    Assistant Professor, College of Wooster, Ohio, USA
  • Tia Palermo
    Assistant Professor, Stony Brook University, New York, USA
  • Chen Reis
    Clinical Associate Professor, University of Denver, Colorado, USA
  • Alexander Vu
    Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University, Maryland, USA

Members of the Missing Peace Initiative Steering Committee

  • Kathleen Kuehnast
    Director, Center for Gender and Peacebuilding, USIP
  • Chantal de Jonge Oudraat
    President, Women in International Security (WIIS)
  • Kim Thuy Seelinger
    Director, Sexual Violence Program, Human Rights Center University of California-Berkeley
  • Inger Skjelsbæk
    Deputy Director, Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO)

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