This event, originally scheduled for January 9, has been rescheduled for March 6.

Civil wars have been on the rise in recent years, causing immense suffering, from mass atrocities to famine, and historic numbers of displaced people. Violence is endemic in many urban centers, while the lives of large numbers of women and children are shaped by their experience of violence in situations of fragility. Through the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, all governments have committed to fostering peaceful, just and inclusive societies which are free from fear and violence. How can diverse communities working on prevention, peacebuilding, rights, and governance mobilize to implement this global framework for tackling violence and fragility?

As we recently celebrated the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, we are conscious that violent conflicts cause unacceptable levels of civilian casualties, atrocities and abuses in fragile states. Disparities run deep and are intensified by conflict and violence. The most unequal societies are often the most violent. Weak institutions, rampant corruption, and high levels of exclusion fuel insecurity and damage communities and economies. More than half of the world’s poorest people are projected to live in fragile states by 2030. 

Sustainable Development Goal 16.1 promises to “significantly reduce all forms of violence” everywhere, but lethal violence is expected to rise by 2030 according to current trends. This is not inevitable. We have compelling evidence to show that conflict and violence can be prevented through multisectoral action to resolve disputes, strengthen institutions, tackle exclusion, and invest in human potential.

At a time of global peril, join the Carnegie Mellon University's Heinz College of Information Systems and Public Policy in Washington, New York University’s Center on International Cooperation, and the U.S. Institute of Peace for a lively panel discussion on how to mobilize behind a roadmap that will put peace at the heart of the 2030 Agenda. Take part in the conversation on Twitter with #SDG16.

Speakers

Laura E. Bailey
Global Lead, Stability Peace and Security, SURR Global Practice, World Bank Group

Ambassador Sarah Mendelson
Distinguished Service Professor of Public Policy, and Head of Carnegie Mellon University's Heinz College of Information Systems and Public Policy in Washington

Daniel Nagin 
The Teresa and H. John Heinz III University Professor of Public Policy and Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University's Heinz College of Information Systems and Public Policy

Maria Stephan
Director of the Program on Nonviolent Action, U.S. Institute of Peace

David Steven
Senior Fellow and Associate Director, New York University’s Center on International Cooperation

The Honorable Nancy Lindborg, moderator 
President & CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

Related Publications

Four Years After ISIS, Iraq’s Tal Afar Remains Riven by Communal Divisions

Four Years After ISIS, Iraq’s Tal Afar Remains Riven by Communal Divisions

Monday, August 2, 2021

By: Osama Gharizi; Joshua Levkowitz

Iraq is a country beset by a host of political, security, economic and social challenges, including addressing the human legacy of the Islamic State’s (ISIS) rampage through the country just a few years ago. Almost four years after the liberation of Nineveh’s Tal Afar district from ISIS control, feelings of marginalization, neglect and exclusion persist among communities in the region, epitomizing how such feelings have driven ethnic and sectarian tensions and conflict in post-2003 Iraq. Recognition of these sentiments and an understanding of the factors underpinning them, can help communities in the district allay these drivers of tension and move forward together.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Reconciliation; Fragility & Resilience

Beyond Security: The Quest for a Sustained, Strategic U.S.-Iraq Partnership

Beyond Security: The Quest for a Sustained, Strategic U.S.-Iraq Partnership

Thursday, July 29, 2021

By: Sarhang Hamasaeed

On Monday, President Joe Biden received Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi at the Oval Office to strengthen bilateral relations and discuss matters of mutual interest, key among them being the future of U.S. troops in Iraq. Despite widespread thinking that Iraq and the Middle East do not rank high in the mix of the Biden administration’s priorities, there have been clear signals that Iraq remains important enough to the United States and that Kadhimi and his government are partners that the United States can work with and should support. While most of the media attention focused on the announcement of the change in U.S. force posture in Iraq, the key takeaway from this week’s meeting is that the United States and Iraq seek to maintain their strategic partnership — and build on it.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy; Fragility & Resilience

Five Key Considerations To Make the U.S. Global Fragility Strategy Work

Five Key Considerations To Make the U.S. Global Fragility Strategy Work

Wednesday, July 28, 2021

By: Corinne Graff; Tyler Beckelman

Even as the public debate over the U.S. military withdrawal from Afghanistan continues, the State Department and USAID are quietly putting plans in place to test a new approach to con-flicts overseas. Drawing on the hard-earned lessons from Afghanistan and Iraq over the past two decades, this approach would have the United States rely far less on military power and far more on sustained — but much less costly — diplomacy and closely coordinated development investments. If fully implemented, consistent with the recently enacted Global Fragility Act, this new effort promises to help stabilize countries in their recovery from COVID-19 and the knock-on shocks to their economies. 

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Fragility & Resilience; Conflict Analysis & Prevention

Climate change risks new violent conflict. How to respond?

Climate change risks new violent conflict. How to respond?

Monday, July 19, 2021

By: Tegan Blaine

As climate change amplifies weather disasters and destabilizes food and water supplies, recent research is confirming its effects on the global south: Our planet’s warming is weakening already fragile states, increasing the risk of violent conflicts and accelerating human displacement and migration. Like any global shock, it is putting poorer nations most at risk. The United States and the international community can counter these rising hazards by setting basic priorities in assistance programs. Among these are to target cities with a strategy that helps local populations adapt to climate change and manage conflicts nonviolently, and to strengthen regional organizations’ abilities to tackle fragility problems.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Fragility & Resilience; Economics & Environment

View All Publications