The U.S. Institute of Peace hosted Ambassador Susan E. Rice, National Security Advisor, on July 30, 2014, to set the scene for the US-Africa Leaders Summit.

rice

During the first week of August 2014, approximately 50 African heads of state will come to Washington for the first ever U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit. This will be a unique opportunity for President Obama and senior U.S. government officials to interact directly with many of the most influential men and women in Africa. Ambassador Susan E. Rice, national security advisor and a longtime Africa expert, has been deeply involved in planning the Summit.

USIP was pleased to welcome Amb. Rice as she set the scene for the Summit and discussed the administration's goals and expectations for this historic event. Join the conversation on Twitter with #RiceatUSIP.

 

Latest Publications

Myanmar’s Ongoing War Against Women

Myanmar’s Ongoing War Against Women

Tuesday, November 30, 2021

By: Kathleen Kuehnast, Ph.D.;  Gabriela Sagun

When the United Nations began its annual campaign to end violence against women 30 years ago, no one had Myanmar on their radar. But in recent years, Myanmar’s military has escalated its use of sexual and gender-based violence to terrorize women and girls — most infamously against ethnic minorities, notably the Rohingya. Confronted by these atrocities, the international community has issued widespread demands for accountability and justice that have yet to come to fruition.  

Type: Analysis and Commentary

GenderHuman Rights

Unrealized Ideal: 40 Years After a Seminal Declaration on Religious Freedom

Unrealized Ideal: 40 Years After a Seminal Declaration on Religious Freedom

Monday, November 29, 2021

By: Knox Thames

Anniversaries serve as natural inflection points, opportunities for introspection, to take stock and to consider where to go next. November 25 marked the 40th anniversary of the 1981 U.N. Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief. Despite its unwieldy name, the aim was simple: to promote freedom of religion or belief and condemn discrimination based on faith. The 1981 Declaration was a culmination of almost four decades of U.N. efforts to develop international legal protections for freedom of belief to defend minorities from persecution. Forty years later, however, almost two-thirds of humanity live in countries with restrictions on the practice of faith. 

Type: Analysis and Commentary

ReligionHuman Rights

Many Venezuelans Choose a Flawed Election Over No Election

Many Venezuelans Choose a Flawed Election Over No Election

Tuesday, November 23, 2021

By: Ana Caridad;  Keith Mines

Venezuelans elected governors, mayors and local officials November 21 in a vote condemned by many as stacked hopelessly against the opposition or simply fraudulent. An increased turnout over elections last year appears to reflect many Venezuelans’ growing belief that they have gained little with voting boycotts. They believe participation in even a flawed election advances the concept of “re-institutionalization,” which aims to progressively reform the machinery of democracy after years in which it has been undermined by the ruling party. Advocates of this strategy say that restoring democracy must be a long game of incremental advances.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance

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