The U.S. Institute of Peace hosted Ambassador Susan E. Rice, National Security Advisor, on July 30, 2014, to set the scene for the US-Africa Leaders Summit.

rice

During the first week of August 2014, approximately 50 African heads of state will come to Washington for the first ever U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit. This will be a unique opportunity for President Obama and senior U.S. government officials to interact directly with many of the most influential men and women in Africa. Ambassador Susan E. Rice, national security advisor and a longtime Africa expert, has been deeply involved in planning the Summit.

USIP was pleased to welcome Amb. Rice as she set the scene for the Summit and discussed the administration's goals and expectations for this historic event. Join the conversation on Twitter with #RiceatUSIP.

 

Latest Publications

Sudan Remains at a Stalemate After the Military’s Crackdown

Sudan Remains at a Stalemate After the Military’s Crackdown

Thursday, June 20, 2019

By: Elizabeth Murray

It’s been over two months since Sudan’s longtime dictator, Omar al-Bashir, was overthrown by the country’s military following months of popular protests. On June 3, the Transitional Military Council (TMC)—which has been ruling since Bashir’s ouster—escalated its lethal crackdown on peaceful protesters in Khartoum and other cities. The protesters say that their demand is the same as before—a transition to civilian rule—but that they will not negotiate with the TMC unless it first meets certain conditions. What’s happening in Sudan? When will negotiations on the country’s transition resume? How can the international community help? USIP’s Elizabeth Murray discusses the latest on the situation in Sudan.

Democracy & Governance

Frank Aum on North Korea Nuclear Negotiations

Frank Aum on North Korea Nuclear Negotiations

Thursday, June 20, 2019

By: Frank Aum

A year after the first summit between President Trump and Kim Jong Un, “both sides are very much committed to diplomacy and trying to reach an agreement,” says Frank Aum. Despite the stalled talks, Aum says that Chinese President Xi’s visit to North Korea will likely encourage Kim to continue along the path of diplomacy.

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

The Religious Landscape in South Sudan: Challenges and Opportunities for Engagement

The Religious Landscape in South Sudan: Challenges and Opportunities for Engagement

Thursday, June 20, 2019

By: Jacqueline Wilson

Since the beginning of South Sudan's civil war in 2013, the country's religious actors have sought to play an active role in turning the tide from war and violence to peace and reconciliation. Drawing on interviews, focus groups, and consultations, this report maps the religious landscape of South Sudan and showcases the legitimate and influential religious actors and institutions, highlights challenges impeding their peace work, and provides recommendations for policymakers and practitioners to better engage with religious actors for peace.

Religion

The Need for a New U.S. Information Strategy for North Korea

The Need for a New U.S. Information Strategy for North Korea

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

By: Nat Kretchun

Through the successive regimes of Kim Il Sung, Kim Jong Il, and Kim Jong Un, North Korea has maintained near-total control over the information that reaches its citizens. Now, as more and more North Koreans use networked devices such as smartphones, the regime is employing modern forms of censorship and surveillance to control information and curtail freedom of expression. This report argues that the United States and its allies need a new information strategy to end the social isolation of the North Korean people and improve their long-term welfare.

Global Policy

Exposure to Violence and Voting in Karachi, Pakistan

Exposure to Violence and Voting in Karachi, Pakistan

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

By: Mashail Malik ; Niloufer Siddiqui

Pakistan’s 2018 elections marked just the second time in history that power transferred peacefully from one civilian government to another after a full term in office. Although the initial months of campaigning were relatively free of violence, the two weeks before polling were dangerous for campaigners and voters alike, and the elections provided a platform for some parties to incite violence, particularly against Pakistan’s minority sects. This report provides a deep examination of how exposure to political violence in Pakistan’s largest city affects political behavior, including willingness to vote and faith in the democratic process.

Electoral Violence

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