The aim of this micro-course is to provide participants with a quick overview of the challenges and opportunities in achieving good governance within the complex context of conflict affected societies.

A woman votes in an election.
A woman votes in an election. Photo from Wikimedia.

Course Overview

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Identify key dimensions of governance.
  • Describe the types of corruption and the challenges that arise from each.
  • Explain the interrelationship between rule of law, democracy, human rights and governance.
  • Discuss the role of civil society in transition environments.

Agenda

Section 1 - Introduction

Introduces the importance of governance through real-world stories and asks the learner to reflect on their prior knowledge.

Section 2 - Pillars

Looks at the main concepts that shape how good governance is understood to provide a holistic perspective.

Section 3 - Tools

Introduces the primary tools and approaches to good governance, paying special attention to the variety of approaches to governance that can be applied in post-conflict environments.

Section 4 - Application

Explores how the key themes of this course apply to real-life cases by examining democratic transitions and the four steps to sustainable governance.

Section 5 - Conclusion

Provides a space for self-reflection and tests retention while earning a certificate.

Course Instructor

  • Debra Liang-Fenton, Consultant and former Senior Program Officer, U.S. Institute of Peace

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