The aim of this micro-course is to provide participants with a quick overview of the challenges and opportunities in achieving good governance within the complex context of conflict affected societies.

A woman votes in an election in Kazakhstan.
A woman votes in an election in Kazakhstan. Photo from Wikimedia.

Course Overview

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Identify key dimensions of governance;
  • Describe the types of corruption and the challenges that arise from each;
  • Explain the interrelationship between rule of law, democracy, human rights and governance; and
  • Discuss the role of civil society in transition environments.

Agenda

Section 1 - Overview of Governance

Provides a description of the key dimensions of governance.

Section 2 - The Challenges and Importance of Combating Corruption

Identifies the different types of corruption and the challenges they pose in a post-conflict society.

Section 3 - Rule of Law and Governance

Reviews the interrelationship between rule of law, democracy, human rights and governance.

Section 4 - Strengthening Democratic Openings

Discusses the role of civil society in transition environments.

Section 5 - Quiz

Assesses your understanding and retention of key terms, concepts, and ideas presented in this course.

Section 6 - Ask the Instructor

Provides additional information from the instructor.

Section 7 - Reflection

Allows you to share what you have learned and read what others have learned from this course and how these skills and knowledge will impact the work we do.

Instructors and Guest Experts

Instructor

Debra Liang-Fenton, Senior Program Officer, United States Institute of Peace

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