The U.S. Institute of Peace established the Africa Center in October 2020 to deepen, elevate, and expand the Institute’s commitment to stem violent conflict in Africa by advancing dialogue and informing policy that is underpinned by evidence, experience, and learning.

Partnerships with African countries offer tremendous possibilities to advance shared values, priorities, and U.S and global security. African citizens consistently express their preference for democratic and accountable governance, and the continent has the fastest growing and youngest population in the world. These realities are driving innovation in technology, health, citizen engagement, and conflict resolution.

And from violent extremism to global health challenges to major power competition, Africa’s future directly impacts our own. Recognizing this interconnectedness, the Africa Center helps advance peace agreements and political processes and seeks to forge a dialogue on genuine partnerships between the United States and African countries to build healthier state-society relationships and inclusive societies.

The Africa Center partners with those working to prevent, mitigate, and resolve conflict by using analysis, training, and in-country programming to achieve sustainable and inclusive peace. Specifically, the Center leads the Institute’s engagement in sub-Saharan Africa:

  • In Nigeria, the Africa Center engages in direct action for peace by fostering the development of inclusive, accountable, and effective institutions of governance, security, and conflict resolution through strengthening the state-level peacebuilding architecture, including community peacebuilding.
  • Across the Greater Horn of Africa, the Africa Center promotes inclusion through improved communication between government and citizens while building citizen capacity to conduct research, implement programming, and inform inclusive policymaking that prevents and reduces the threat of violence.
  • In the Sahel region, the Africa Center empowers its partners to transform ongoing violent conflicts in order to build community resilience and inclusive and responsive institutions.

The Africa Center partners with civic networks and organizations—as well as regional and continental bodies—who are championing the nonviolent resolution of conflicts:

Across all of its work, the Africa Center examines the impact of regional and global power competition on the continent by supporting informed policies and effective systems for international cooperation. Working in partnership with USIP’s China program, the Africa Center explores opportunities for new multilateral formats to prevent, mitigate, and resolve conflict, including in the Red Sea arena. The Africa Center works closely with USIP’s Middle East and North Africa Center to understand transregional conflict dynamics and connect local peacebuilders to regional efforts.

Current Projects

Network of Nigerian Facilitators

Network of Nigerian Facilitators

The Network of Nigerian Facilitators (NNF) is a group of professional peace mediators trained and advised by USIP to mitigate and resolve local conflicts through nonviolent means in Nigeria. Since 2018, USIP has supported the NNF with the aim of preventing conflicts from escalating beyond the community level by piloting dialogue-based approaches and connecting local peacebuilders with policymakers to inform government responses to conflicts.

Conflict Analysis & PreventionElectoral ViolenceMediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

South Sudan Peace Process Archive

South Sudan Peace Process Archive

The South Sudan Peace Process Archive was created with the cooperation of the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) and the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), with funding from the U.S. Department of State. The objective of this Archive is to provide South Sudanese citizens, regional actors, mediators, policymakers, academics, and other interested readers a window into the 2013-2015 negotiations that attempted to end the conflict that began in South Sudan in late 2013. The Archive is also intended to facilitate comparative study in conflict mediation and to help inform other peace processes.

Peace Processes

Women Preventing Violent Extremism (WPVE) in the Horn and Sahel

Women Preventing Violent Extremism (WPVE) in the Horn and Sahel

USIP’s Women Preventing Violent Extremism (WPVE) program aims to shape national policies and community approaches to countering violent extremism in the Horn of Africa and the Sahel. USIP does this by empowering women-led organizations and building local capacity that fosters collaboration between community-level activists and national-level policymakers.

GenderViolent Extremism

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Featured Publications

In Africa, Putin’s War on Ukraine Drives Food, Fuel and Finance Crises

In Africa, Putin’s War on Ukraine Drives Food, Fuel and Finance Crises

Thursday, June 30, 2022

By: Edward A. Burrier

Vladimir Putin’s unprovoked war on Ukraine has unleashed a wave of destruction and atrocities against its brave people. But the suffering and instability are not contained to Europe. Indeed, a continent away, Putin’s war has unleashed a “three-headed hydra” of food, energy and finance shortages in Africa, further threatening vulnerable Africans and putting dozens of countries at risk of default. Recognizing the need to tackle food insecurity, the Group of Seven (G-7) countries pledged billions more in assistance this week. But will it be enough given the severity of these challenges?

Type: Analysis and Commentary

EconomicsGlobal Policy

Regional Security Support: A Vital First Step for Peace in Mozambique

Regional Security Support: A Vital First Step for Peace in Mozambique

Thursday, June 23, 2022

By: Andrew Cheatham;  Amanda Long;  Thomas P. Sheehy

Over the last year, Mozambique has seen a marked improvement in security conditions in its troubled Cabo Delgado region. The military intervention of Southern African Development Community (SADC) member states and Rwanda has disrupted an Islamist insurgency that emerged in 2017 and has since inflicted an enormous toll on the region. Security in key areas of Cabo Delgado and neighboring provinces has stabilized, giving the Mozambican government — and its international backers — an opportunity to foster reconciliation leading to an enduring peace. The Mozambican government should immediately take advantage of this exceptional regional commitment, which won’t last forever.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Justice, Security & Rule of Law

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