Mirna Galic is a senior policy analyst for China and East Asia at the U.S. Institute of Peace. Her areas of expertise include relations between U.S. partners in Asia and Europe and how such relations enable these partners to address regional and international security issues.  

Prior to joining USIP, Galic lived and worked in Tokyo in 2018 and 2019 as a Council on Foreign Relations-Hitachi International Affairs fellow at the Japan Institute of International Affairs, where she remains a nonresident senior fellow. She also spent seven years as a senior advisor with the U.S. government at both the Department of State and in the U.S. Senate. Previously, she served as a special advisor in the Executive Office of the Secretary-General at the United Nations.  

Galic is the author of various works, including a series of papers on Japan-NATO relations. She holds a master’s in international relations from Princeton University and a bachelor’s in environmental studies from Stanford University.

Publications By Mirna

Why the New U.S.-U.K.-Australia Partnership Is So Significant

Why the New U.S.-U.K.-Australia Partnership Is So Significant

Friday, September 17, 2021

By: Brian Harding; Carla Freeman, Ph.D; Mirna Galic; Henry Tugendhat; Rachel Vandenbrink

The United States and the United Kingdom have made the rare decision to share nuclear submarine propulsion technology with Australia in a move seen aimed at China. In a joint statement on September 15, the leaders of the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia announced the formation of a trilateral partnership — AUKUS — that, among other things, seeks to “strengthen the ability of each to support our security and defense interests.” USIP’s Brian Harding, Carla Freeman, Mirna Galic, Henry Tugendhat and Rachel Vandenbrink discuss the significance of the decision and what to expect next.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

As China Poses Challenges, Europe Makes its Presence Known in the Indo-Pacific

As China Poses Challenges, Europe Makes its Presence Known in the Indo-Pacific

Tuesday, August 3, 2021

By: Mirna Galic

A German frigate that left the country yesterday for the Indo-Pacific region will be Berlin’s first warship to cross the South China Sea in almost 20 years. This follows the United Kingdom’s late July announcement that two of its warships would have a permanent presence in the Indo-Pacific. Currently, the U.K. has a highly publicized carrier strike group in the region, featuring the largest U.K. warship ever deployed. And earlier this year, France deployed an amphibious ready group through the region — accompanied by the February revelation that a French nuclear attack submarine had completed passage through the South China Sea. Although the U.S. naval presence in the region is well known, Europe’s has received much less attention — that is, until recently.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Global Policy

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