Mirna Galic is a senior policy analyst for China and East Asia at the U.S. Institute of Peace. Her areas of expertise include relations between U.S. partners in Asia and Europe and how such relations enable these partners to address regional and international security issues.  

Prior to joining USIP, Galic lived and worked in Tokyo in 2018 and 2019 as a Council on Foreign Relations-Hitachi International Affairs fellow at the Japan Institute of International Affairs, where she remains a nonresident senior fellow. She also spent seven years as a senior advisor with the U.S. government at both the Department of State and in the U.S. Senate. Previously, she served as a special advisor in the Executive Office of the Secretary-General at the United Nations.  

Galic is the author of various works, including a series of papers on Japan-NATO relations. She holds a master’s in international relations from Princeton University and a bachelor’s in environmental studies from Stanford University.

Publications By Mirna

Despite Ukraine Focus, Asia-Pacific to Play Prominent Role at NATO Summit

Despite Ukraine Focus, Asia-Pacific to Play Prominent Role at NATO Summit

Monday, June 27, 2022

By: Mirna Galic

NATO countries meet this week in Madrid, Spain amid Russia’s war on Ukraine, the biggest test the alliance has faced in decades. The summit is expected to focus heavily on demonstrating NATO’s unity, support for Ukraine and the bids of Finland and Sweden — propelled by Russia’s aggressive incursion — to join the alliance. But developments in the Asia-Pacific, chiefly the rise of China, will also be a top item on the agenda, with Australia, Japan, New Zealand and South Korea participating at the leader level for the first time at a NATO summit.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

Amid Ukraine War, U.S. Signals the Indo-Pacific is a Vital Priority

Amid Ukraine War, U.S. Signals the Indo-Pacific is a Vital Priority

Thursday, June 9, 2022

By: Mirna Galic;  Brian Harding;  Tamanna Salikuddin;  Vikram J. Singh

While the Ukraine war continues to dominate policymakers’ attention, the Biden administration has engaged in a series of diplomatic initiatives with allies and partners across the Indo-Pacific region over the course of the last two months. The message is clear: Washington sees the Indo-Pacific as the world’s principal geostrategic region, with a host of challenges to meet — like competition with China and climate change — and opportunities to seize, particularly related to technology and the economy.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

EconomicsGlobal Policy

Biden’s Asia Trip Seeks to Revitalize Alliances, Focus on China

Biden’s Asia Trip Seeks to Revitalize Alliances, Focus on China

Wednesday, May 25, 2022

By: Frank Aum;  Mirna Galic;  Rachel Vandenbrink

President Biden made his first trip to East Asia beginning late last week, visiting South Korea and Japan, where he participated in a leader’s summit of the so-called Quad, which includes Australia, Japan and India. The president’s visit is part of a flurry of Asia-focused diplomatic initiatives in recent weeks including the U.S.-ASEAN summit, the U.S.-India 2+2 Ministerial Dialogue and an upcoming speech from Secretary of State Blinken, which is expected to lay out the contours of the administration’s China Policy.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

U.S. Diplomatic Boycott of Beijing Olympics: No Longer 'Business as Usual'

U.S. Diplomatic Boycott of Beijing Olympics: No Longer 'Business as Usual'

Thursday, December 9, 2021

By: Lauren Baillie;  Mirna Galic;  Rachel Vandenbrink

On Monday the Biden administration announced it would not send an official United States delegation to the Beijing Winter Olympic Games as a statement against China's "ongoing genocide and crimes against humanity in Xinjiang," as well as other human rights abuses such as in Hong Kong. U.S. athletes will still be allowed to compete in the Games, which start in February. USIP’s Lauren Baillie, Mirna Galic and Rachel Vandenbrink discuss the rationale behind the decision, how the boycott fits into the U.S. strategy surrounding the Uyghur crisis and how China and U.S. allies are responding.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global PolicyHuman Rights

What the Quad Leaders’ Summit Means for the Indo-Pacific Amid Rising Tensions with China

What the Quad Leaders’ Summit Means for the Indo-Pacific Amid Rising Tensions with China

Tuesday, September 28, 2021

By: Carla Freeman, Ph.D.;  Mirna Galic;  Brian Harding;  Daniel Markey, Ph.D.;  Vikram J. Singh

On September 24, President Biden hosted Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga at the White House for the first-ever in-person Quad Leaders’ Summit. The event marked a milestone for the group, which started as an ad hoc coordination mechanism for humanitarian assistance and disaster relief after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. The four leaders unveiled a slate of new initiatives on a range of pressing global issues — from climate change and COVID-19 to technology, infrastructure and education — as well as formalized plans to meet annually.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

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