As senior program officer for CVE, Chris collaborates across USIP, USG elements, and NGOs on the rehabilitation and reintegration people disengaging from violent extremism. In this role, he leads implementation several Global Counterterrorism Forum (GCTF) Foreign Terrorist Fighters Working Group initiatives, where he has developed several GCTF good practice documents. Chris’ approach to rehabilitation addresses cognitive, social, and structural drivers of violent extremism to encourage prosocial behavior, reconciliation, and community resilience.

Chris comes to USIP from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), where he served as senior advisor for CT/CVE, political stability/human rights, and crisis management to the National Intelligence Manager for East Asia. There, he was a voice for prioritizing preventive CVE efforts in the policy discourse. He aligned intelligence community support to the National Security Council to inform strategic responses to the Rohingya crisis in Burma, democratic backsliding throughout Southeast Asia, and North Korea’s nuclear and ballistic missile programs.

Prior to ODNI, Chris served for a decade as a Navy intelligence officer. His assignments included the Joint Staff, Defense Intelligence Agency, and a tour of duty aboard the USS CARL VINSON. He has produced the daily intelligence update for the Secretary of Defense and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, developed an analytic framework to assess fragile societies and provide early warning of violence, and orchestrated the delivery of relief material in the immediate aftermath of Haiti’s 2010 earthquake.

Chris’ record of peer-reviewed publication includes contributions to International Studies Review and edited volumes, and he has provided commentary for outlets such as The Hill. He holds a master’s degree in international security, conflict, and development from Georgetown University, backed by a post-graduate certificate from Johns Hopkins SAIS and a BA in political science from the University of Pittsburgh. He enjoys travel with his husband Cody, thinks Springsteen’s Darkness on the Edge of Town album is severely underrated, and appreciates wine as a form of art.

Publications By Christopher

Can Syrians Who Left ISIS Be Reintegrated into Their Communities?

Can Syrians Who Left ISIS Be Reintegrated into Their Communities?

Wednesday, October 21, 2020

By: Mona Yacoubian ; Chris Bosley; Leanne Erdberg Steadman

More than a year since the territorial defeat of ISIS, the region is still reeling in the wake of the self-styled caliphate’s destruction. Kurdish authorities operate two dozen detention facilities in northeast Syria holding thousands of former ISIS fighters. On October 5, Kurdish authorities in charge of al-Hol said they would free the 24,000 Syrians in the camp, where conditions have become increasingly unsustainable. USIP’s Mona Yacoubian, Chris Bosley, and Leanne Erdberg Steadman look at what led to the decision to release these Syrians and the challenges ahead for reintegrating them into their communities.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Reconciliation; Violent Extremism

To End ISIS, We Must Find Futures for Its Survivors

To End ISIS, We Must Find Futures for Its Survivors

Wednesday, September 2, 2020

By: Chris Bosley

At age 15, Shamima Begum ran away from home in England and, with two girlfriends, ventured into Syria’s war to join ISIS. Within days, she was married to an ISIS fighter; she has since had three children, all of whom have died. Begum, one of 70,000 former residents of the ISIS-declared state now confined in a displacement camp in Syria’s desert, is asking a British court to overturn a government order that stripped her of her citizenship. As nations worldwide seek justice, accountability—and their own security from ISIS’ violent extremism—Begum’s story shows how a “peacebuilding” approach is needed.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Violent Extremism; Reconciliation

Violent Extremist Disengagement and Reconciliation: A Peacebuilding Approach

Violent Extremist Disengagement and Reconciliation: A Peacebuilding Approach

Wednesday, July 29, 2020

By: Chris Bosley

Existing efforts to disengage people from violent extremism are derived from security imperatives rather than from a peacebuilding ethos. This report—one of a series to be published by USIP’s program on violent extremism—presents a framework through which peacebuilders can foster disengagement from violent extremism and reconciliation between those disengaging and affected communities by examining the individual, social, and structural dynamics involved.

Type: Peaceworks

Violent Extremism

A Sustainable Approach for Disengaging Violent Extremists

A Sustainable Approach for Disengaging Violent Extremists

Thursday, February 20, 2020

By: Chris Bosley

Governments and communities worldwide are facing the increasingly daunting challenge of what to do when citizens who participated in violent extremist conflicts return home. With ISIS’s territorial caliphate extinguished, more than 100 countries could face the task of not only having to reintegrate their citizens, but also preparing their communities for a future with them living next door. This is a society-wide challenge that will engage a cross-cutting spectrum of stakeholders deploying a range of peacebuilding and other tools to build communities and individuals who are more resilient to violent extremism.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Reconciliation; Violent Extremism

Where Public Health and Peacebuilding Converge

Where Public Health and Peacebuilding Converge

Thursday, January 16, 2020

By: Chris Bosley; Fouad Pervez

In many ways, peacebuilding and public health are kindred disciplines in that they both require whole-of-society approaches to succeed. But while both disciplines share similar traits, the relationship between peacebuilding and public health is often overlooked. In any country, public health services such as healthcare facilities, water sanitation, and accessible medicine are critical for citizens’ welfare. But in fragile or conflict-affected states, these services become even more important—serving as a foundation for healing and stability throughout a peace process. To examine this important dynamic, USIP’s Fouad Pervez and Chris Bosley look at three situations where the goals of peacebuilding and public health are intertwined.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Human Rights; Violent Extremism

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