As diplomacy struggles to overcome deep divides across the globe, international education plays an increasingly important role in fostering sustainable peace. Communication and understanding improve through educational exchanges, foreign study and the embrace of cultural differences. Last year, the number of American students abroad rose almost 3 percent to a record 313,000 while the international population at U.S. colleges and universities topped 1 million for the first time. On November 16, the U.S. Institute of Peace and NAFSA: Association of International Educators held a discussion of how international education can strengthen diplomacy and contribute to peacebuilding.

Global learning exchanges are designed to promote inclusivity, build cross-cultural dialogues and encourage critical thinking—important tools for diplomatic efforts and for building sustainable peace. Panelists, including experts from the diplomatic, peacebuilding and international education communities, considered how innovative approaches to learning and new ideas from the communications, business and scientific fields can be harnessed to strengthen ties between communities in conflict and contribute to more peaceful societies.

Continue the conversation on Twitter with #IEW2017.

Agenda

8:30am - 9:00am - Coffee, tea, and networking

9:00am - 9:15am - Welcome and Framing the Day

  • Ambassador William B. Taylor, Executive Vice President, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Esther Brimmer, D.Phil., Executive Director and CEO, NAFSA

9:15am - 10:45am - Session I: International Education and Building a Transatlantic Community

  • Caroline Vicini, Deputy Ambassador to the USA, European Union Delegation 
  • Sharon Hudson-Dean, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Public Diplomacy, U.S. Department of State
  • Daniel S. Hamilton, PhD, Executive Director of the Center for Transatlantic Relations, Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies SAIS
  • Moderator: Esther Brimmer, D.Phil., Executive Director and CEO, NAFSA

10:45am - 11:45am - Session II: Global Perspectives on International Education and Building Communities

  • Mark S. Langevin, Ph.D., Director, Brazil Initiative, George Washington University
  • John Holden, CEO, 100K Strong Foundation
  • Javier Botero, Higher Education Division, World Bank, invited
  • Moderator: Alison Milofsky, Director, Training & Curriculum Design, Academy, U.S. Institute of Peace

11:45am - 12:45pm - Session III: New Intersections between Education and Peacebuilding 

  • Julia Roig, President, PartnersGlobal
  • Bridget Moix, US Senior Representative, Peace Direct
  • Moderator: Jeffrey Helsing, Associate Vice President, Academy,  U.S. Institute of Peace

Related Publications

Thomas Hill on Libya

Thomas Hill on Libya

Friday, November 9, 2018

By: Thomas M. Hill

Since the fall of Muammar Qaddafi in 2011, successive U.S. administrations have watched Libya’s continuing collapse, mistakenly believing that the country’s unraveling threatens only Europe, says Thomas Hill. Ahead of the Palermo conference, which aims to find a solution to the crisis in Libya, Hill says that United States’ should play a more direct role in stabilizing the country.

Democracy & Governance; Conflict Analysis & Prevention

Why the U.S. Needs a Special Envoy for the Red Sea

Why the U.S. Needs a Special Envoy for the Red Sea

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

By: Payton Knopf

The Trump administration has appointed four special envoys to coordinate U.S. policy toward key hot spots: Iran, North Korea, Syria, and Afghanistan. Yet in the Red Sea—one of the most volatile and lethal regions of the world afflicted by several interconnected conflicts and rivalries that pose significant challenges to American interests—U.S. policy has been rudderless in large part due to the absence of a similar post.

Global Policy; Conflict Analysis & Prevention

Mona Yacoubian on the State of Play in Syria

Mona Yacoubian on the State of Play in Syria

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

By: Mona Yacoubian

Mona Yacoubian discusses the state of play in Syria ahead of important withdrawal deadlines this week for removing heavy weapons from Idlib province. Yacoubian also discusses the waves of migration forced by the crisis, noting that 2018 has been the worst year to date for internally displaced Syrians; and the recent news that U.S. special operations forces are likely to remain in the country indefinitely to prevent a possible re-emergence of ISIS.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

View All Publications