Most of the world’s most violent conflicts occur in countries with burgeoning populations of young people. Often these youth are the most vulnerable to the ravages of war. At the same time, more than 80 percent of people globally identify as religious, and their leaders and representatives often work on the front lines to prevent and reduce violent conflict. Yet both groups too often are excluded from formal peace efforts. On August 1, authors of a new U.S. Institute of Peace Special Report held a webcast conversation on how these two groups are working together and ways they can contribute even more to the cause of peace.

In December 2015, the United Nations Security Council adopted Resolution 2250 on Youth, Peace and Security, calling for young people to be integrated into efforts to prevent and reduce violent conflict. Building on research, case studies, surveys and interviews, the recently-published USIP report, “Implementing UNSCR 2250: Youth and Religious Actors Engaging for Peace," outlined how the two sectors work together now, how remaining gaps can be addressed to further the goals of the U.N. resolution, and the benefits to be gained from the new approach. 

In this webcast, the three authors drew from their experiences in the field and the findings in their report.

Continue the conversation on Twitter with #YouthReligionPeace.

Speakers

Daryn Cambridge, Moderator 
Senior Program Officer, Center for Applied Conflict Transformation, U.S. Institute of Peace

Imrana Alhaji Buba
Founder, Youth Coalition Against Terrorism
USIP Generation Change Fellow and Nigerian youth leader

Aubrey Cox
Senior Program Specialist, Youth, U.S. Institute of Peace

Melissa Nozell
Senior Program Specialist, Religion & Inclusive Societies, U.S. Institute of Peace

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