United Nations peacekeeping operations are vital to global stability, with over 100,000 troops and police deployed to 15 missions, serving 125 million people across the world. But these missions lack sufficient numbers of well-trained troops and a sustainable political plan to resolve complex mandates. Additionally, several missions have been rocked by accusations of sexual exploitation and abuse. The U.N. leadership is pursuing reforms, which have been sought by successive U.S. administrations and members of Congress. How can the U.S. use its influence to ensure progress on reforms to make U.N. peacekeeping more effective, cost-efficient, and professional? 

On Dec. 6, the U.N. undersecretary-general for peacekeeping operations, Jean Pierre Lacroix, and a group of experts discussed what reforms are planned, and what obstacles they face. This event is sponsored by the U.N. Association of the National Capital Area, the United Nations Foundation, and the U.S. Institute of Peace.

The Trump Administration has called for constructive U.N. reforms to answer the challenges of inefficiency and sexual abuse and U.S. officials promise to support reforms announced by Secretary General Antonio Guterres in September. What can the U.N. reform effort mean for making our world more stable—and for U.S. interests?

Continue the conversation on Twitter with #PeacekeepingReform.

Panelists

George Moosemoderator
Vice Chairman of the Board, United States Institute of Peace

Don Bliss
Former President, United Nations Association of the National Capital Area

William Durch
Distinguished Fellow, Stimson Center

Eric Gaudiosi
Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of International Organization Affairs, U.S. Department of State

Victoria K. Holt
Former Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of International Organization Affairs, U.S. Department of State

Jean Pierre Lacroix
Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations, United Nations

Nancy Lindborg
President, United States Institute of Peace

Peter Yeo
President of the Better World Campaign and Vice President for Public Policy and Advocacy, United Nations Foundation

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