August 30 marks the one-year anniversary of the last U.S. troops leaving Afghanistan. The unceremonious end of America’s longest military intervention was overshadowed by the Taliban’s takeover of Kabul two weeks prior, followed by a tumultuous evacuation of tens of thousands of Afghan citizens. Over the past weeks, USIP experts and partners have been assessing Afghanistan’s first year under Taliban rule in key areas, including the deteriorating economy, the humanitarian crisis, the Taliban’s transition from insurgent group to government, the conditions facing women, girls and youth, and current regional dynamics. 

A traffic police officer looks on as Taliban fighters, many of whom drove in from neighboring provinces, gather in Kabul to celebrate the first anniversary of their seizure of control over the capital on Monday, Aug. 15, 2022. (Kiana Hayeri/The New York Times)
(Kiana Hayeri/The New York Times)

On August 31, USIP hosted a Twitter Space discussion with USIP experts on how Afghanistan has changed over the past year, what it means for the country going forward, and ways U.S. and international policy can continue to support efforts for an inclusive and stable Afghanistan that recognizes the rights of all its citizens.

Note: This live Twitter Space was hosted on USIP’s Twitter account, @USIP. A recording of this discussion is also available on this page as an episode of the “USIP Events” podcast.

Continue the conversation on Twitter using the #AfghanistanUSIP hashtag.

Speakers

Scott Worden
Director, Afghanistan and Central Asia, U.S. Institute of Peace
@ScottRWorden

Kate Bateman
Senior Expert, Afghanistan, U.S. Institute of Peace
@katebatemandc

Belquis Ahmadi
Senior Program Officer, Afghanistan, U.S. Institute of Peace
@belquisa2

Asfandyar Mir
Senior Expert, Asia Center, U.S. Institute of Peace
@asfandyarmir

Andrew Watkins 
Senior Expert, Afghanistan, U.S. Institute of Peace
@and_huh_what

William Byrd
Senior Expert, Afghanistan, U.S. Institute of Peace
@BillBparenda

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