Now in its fourth month, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has prevented the export of grain, fertilizer and other agricultural products vital to the world’s food supply. This has been devastating for people living in poor and food-insecure countries, as desperate communities without a reliable food supply could be forced to compete for limited resources or seek support from opportunistic non-government actors. This burgeoning food security crisis not only threatens to exacerbate global humanitarian needs on an unprecedented scale — it could also amplify or trigger conflict in fragile countries and regions.

Emergency food distribution in Mekelle, the capital of Ethiopia’s Tigray region, on June 26, 2021. (Finbarr O'Reilly/The New York Times)
Emergency food distribution in Mekelle, the capital of Ethiopia’s Tigray region, on June 26, 2021. (Finbarr O'Reilly/The New York Times)

With the potential for a global food crisis to greatly accelerate and exacerbate conflict dynamics in fragile states, the international community must adopt a conflict lens to prevent a humanitarian disaster of even greater proportions from unfolding.  

Join USIP for a conversation with leading experts on how the international community can work together to help prevent or mitigate the possibility of violence caused by a food security crisis of this scale.

Speakers

Lise Grande, introductory remarks
President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

Isobel Colemankeynote remarks
Deputy Administrator for Policy and Programming, U.S. Agency for International Development

Abdi Aynte
Former Minisiter of Planning and Economic Promotion, Somalia

Arif Husain
Chief Economist, World Food Program

Haneen Sayed
Lead Human Development Specialist, Middle East and North Africa, World Bank 

Ambassador Johnnie Carson, moderator
Senior Advisor, U.S. Institute of Peace 

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