Around the globe, the struggle between civil society voices and government repression is giving rise to violence, extremism and toxic politics. Professionals in peacebuilding and in governance/democracy recognize the need to work together on issues of governance, legitimacy, fragility and disenfranchisement that underlie many violent conflicts.

AFP
Melanie Greenberg, Sarah Sewall, Nancy Lindborg President

On May 13, the U.S. Institute of Peace and the Alliance for Peacebuilding hosted the first day of the 2015 AfP Annual Conference. The AfP conference, "Peacebuilding and Democracy in a Turbulent World," brought together those who work in peacebuilding with leading policymakers, members of the military, private-sector professionals and civil society representatives to help build bridges in both theory and practice. From repression of civil society in Russia to the spread of violent extremism in the Middle East, the conference highlighted the impact of social movements on peace and democracy. Continue the conversation on Twitter with #AfPeace2015.

Please see the final agenda

Speakers

  • Sarah Sewall
    Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy and Human Rights, U.S. Department of State
  • Melanie Greenberg
    President and CEO, Alliance for Peacebuilding 
  • Nancy Lindborg
    President, U.S. Institute of Peace

logos

Peacebuilding and Democracy in a Turbulent World: Welcoming Remarks

Views from the State Department and USIP

Silencing Voices: The Crisis of Shrinking Civil Society Space Around the World

Innovation Forum: How Neuroscience is Revolutionizing Peacebuilding

Who are you calling extreme? Governance, Religion, & Radicalization in the Age of Terrorism

Establishing Positive Peace: Identifying the Drivers of Conflict and Resilience in Mexico

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