On October 22, USIP hosted an address by the Prime Minister of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, His Excellency Mian Muhammad Nawaz Sharif, in his first public speaking engagement with the Washington policy community since becoming Prime Minister for the third time in June 2013.

NawazSharif-event.jpg
USIP Board Member. Stephen J. Hadley; Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif

Speakers

His Excellency Mian Muhammad Nawaz Sharif, Speaker
Prime Minister, Islamic Republic of Pakistan

Jim Marshall, Welcoming Remarks
President/CEO, United States Institute of Peace

Stephen Hadley, Moderator
Member, Board of Directors, United States Institute of Peace

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