Later this month, Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan will make his first visit to the United States since taking office last year. This visit, including Prime Minister Khan’s first meeting with President Trump, is seen as a crucial step in finding ways to rebuild a robust relationship with the U.S., both in the security and economic domains. Pakistani support for a peace process in Afghanistan has begun to ameliorate some of the high-profile tensions in the bilateral relationship. Concerns, however, remain on issues relating to regional stability and security. On the domestic front, Prime Minister Khan has continued his campaign calls to combat corruption and promised sweeping reforms for the country’s welfare.

On the other hand, Pakistan has been confronted with economic challenges, necessitating a new loan agreement and restructuring plan with the International Monetary Fund. Immediately following his meeting with President Trump, the U.S. Institute of Peace hosted Prime Minister Khan to speak directly on developments in Pakistan and the U.S.-Pakistan relationship at this critical time. Follow the conversation on Twitter with #ImranKhanUSIP.

Transcript

Read a transcript of the conversation.

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