The November 2012 Prevention Newsletter features a spotlight on the Network of Iraqi Facilitators (NIF) in Ninewa, Iraq: A team of three conflict resolution professionals from the NIF took the initiative to bring sectarian leaders to the table to negotiate a peaceful end to the cycle of violence plaguing Ninewa.

In this Issue

  • SPOTLIGHT on the Network of Iraqi Facilitators (NIF) in Ninewa, Iraq: A team of three conflict resolution professionals from the NIF took the initiative to bring sectarian leaders to the table to negotiate a peaceful end to the cycle of violence plaguing Ninewa.
  • HIGHLIGHTS:
    • U.S.-Pakistan Relations
    • Israel-Pakistan at UNGA
    • Constitution Building in Tunisia
    • Conflict Prevention through Regional Integration
    • Reconciliation in Cote d'Ivoire

About This Newsletter

The bimonthly Prevention Newsletter provides highlights of USIP's conceptual work and region specific work aimed at the prevention of conflicts in North Africa, the Middle East, South and Northeast Asia, and our special project on atrocity prevention. It also provides Over the Horizon thinking on trends in different regions, as well as events, working groups and publications. Every Newsletter will spotlight a single country, conflict, or event, and include short highlights of all regions and issues covered by the Center. | Sign up to receive the bi-monthly newsletter via e-mail

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