The United States Institute of Peace convened a workshop in Washington in summer 1996 that brought together Institute senior fellows. Elected participants identified possible areas of cooperation and collaboration and specific strategies of de-escalation, reconciliation, and resolution that could serve as the basis for a new era in Greek-Turkish relations. The insights and creative proposals of the participants are summarized in this report, written by Patricia Carley, program officer in the Institute's Research and Studies Program.

The United States Institute of Peace convened a workshop in Washington in summer 1996 that brought together Institute senior fellows, policy-oriented academics, and government officials responsible for various aspects of U.S. policy in Greece and Turkey. The goals of the workshop were decidedly forward looking. As with many protracted conflicts, the parties' search for recognition of their grievances and their right to present them to the international community must be acknowledged as the first step in a constructive dialogue. In consultation with senior fellows Theodore A. Couloumbis and Tozun Bahcheli, Institute staff in the Jennings Randolph Fellowship Program and the Research and Studies Program selected participants who could best identify possible areas of cooperation and collaboration and specific strategies of de-escalation, reconciliation, and resolution that might serve as the basis for a new era in Greek-Turkish relations. The insights and creative proposals of the participants are summarized in this report, written by Patricia Carley, program officer in the Institute's Research and Studies Program.

Tozun Bahcheli is professor of political science at King's College in London, Ontario, where he teaches courses in international, Middle Eastern, and Balkan politics. Professor Bahcheli was a senior fellow with the Jennings Randolph Program of the United States Institute of Peace during 1995–96. Over the past twenty years, he has conducted research and written on Turkish foreign policy, the Cyprus conflict, and other Greek-Turkish issues. His articles have appeared in various journals, and his book Greek-Turkish Relations Since 1955 was published by Westview Press in 1990.

Patricia Carley is program officer for the former Soviet Union and Turkey at the United States Institute of Peace, where she also works on broader issues such as the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe and Western relations with the Islamic world. She is the author of several Institute publications, including The War in Tajikistan Three Years On, Turkey's Role in the Middle East: A Conference Report, and The Future of the CSCE. She received her B.A. in Soviet studies from the University of Texas at Austin in 1981 and an M.A. from George Washington University in 1983.

Theodore A. Couloumbis is professor of international relations at the University of Athens and was a senior fellow with the Jennings Randolph Program of the United States Institute of Peace during 1995–96. Couloumbis's work focuses on conflict resolution in the post–Cold War international setting.

Related Publications

Engaging Eurasia's Separatist States

Engaging Eurasia's Separatist States

Saturday, May 1, 2004

By: Dov Lynch

In the wake of the dissolution of the Soviet Union, secessionist forces carved four de facto states from parts of Moldova, Georgia, and Azerbaijan. Ten years on, those states are mired in uncertainty. Beset by internal problems, fearful of a return to the violence that spawned them, and isolated and unrecognized internationally, they survive behind cease–fire lines that have temporarily frozen but not resolved their conflicts with the metropolitan powers.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

Conflict Resolution and Preventive Diplomacy

Wednesday, March 10, 2004

The USIP Professional Training Program offered a one day seminar in conflict management skills for participants in a State Department International Visitor Program whose purpose was to acquaint participants with American perspectives on preventive diplomacy and conflict resolution.

Education & Training

Nurturing Peace

Nurturing Peace

Wednesday, April 24, 1996

By: Fen Osler Hampson

Focusing on intrastate conflicts in which third parties have played prominent roles, Hampson argues that durable settlements depend on sustained third-party engagement not only during the negotiation phase but throughout the implementation process.

View All Publications