The dynamics of influence, deterrence and defense in the Asia-Pacific have changed, with the potential consequences for peace and security in the region still to be determined. European allies’ recognition of the strategic challenges posed by China; U.S. efforts to invigorate alliances with Australia, Japan and South Korea; Russia’s war in Ukraine; and China’s reactions to the above will all play a major role in shaping the Asia-Pacific region’s future.

To increase understanding of these changes and their impacts, USIP convened a working group consisting of experts from NATO countries and from NATO’s formal partner countries in the Asia-Pacific: Australia, Japan, South Korea and New Zealand, which are informally known as the Asia-Pacific Four (or AP4). The working group is shedding light on the perspectives, interests and concerns of Asia-Pacific partners on security engagement with Europe, Europe’s role vis-à-vis security challenges from China, impacts of the war in Ukraine, and areas for cooperation between NATO and the AP4.

Pictured left to right: Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese, Japanese Prime Minister Kishida Fumio, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, and South Korean President Yoon Suk-yeol
Pictured left to right: Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese, Japanese Prime Minister Kishida Fumio, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, and South Korean President Yoon Suk-yeol

Working Group on NATO and Asia-Pacific Partners

Coming Soon. USIP will gather the findings from a series of working group discussions into a report aimed at helping U.S., NATO and Asia-Pacific policymakers maximize the benefits and understand the limitations of cooperation as the United States and its allies and partners work to adjust to geostrategic changes.

Expert Papers on NATO and the Asia-Pacific

Coming Soon. USIP has commissioned six experts to draft papers looking at in-depth aspects of NATO cooperation with Asia-Pacific partners, including perspectives from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, South Korea and NATO allies.