Emmanuel is a program officer for climate, environment and conflict at USIP.

He currently manages applied research projects on the security implications of climate change in Africa and provides at-large support to the team’s portfolios on migration and displacement and just transitions to green economies. Hidalgo previously served as a senior regional specialist with USIP’s program on nonviolent action.

Prior to these roles, he was an associate for conflict and stabilization at the Dexis Consulting Group, where he supported USAID’s Office of Transition Initiatives activities in the Horn of Africa and the Lake Chad Basin. Before joining Dexis, Hidalgo served as a research assistant at USIP and contributed to studies on electoral security and governance issues in Africa and Asia. Past affiliations include the Stimson Center, the National Democratic Institute and the Organization of American States.

Emmanuel holds a bachelor’s in political science from the Universidad del Zulia in his native Venezuela, a master’s in peace and conflict resolution from American University’s School of International Service, and a master’s in population and development studies from the Sorbonne. He is fluent in Spanish, English and French.

Publications By Emmanuel

In Earth’s Climate Crisis, Africa Demands a Fairer Sharing of Costs

In Earth’s Climate Crisis, Africa Demands a Fairer Sharing of Costs

Thursday, September 14, 2023

By: Tegan Blaine, Ph.D.;  Emmanuel Davalillo Hidalgo

Earth’s intensifying storms, heat, droughts and floods underscore that humanity is falling behind in its race against climate change. With global powers and institutions still debating how to transform economies and share the costs of surviving a destabilizing climate, the planet’s most vulnerable continent managed partial advances this month toward a regional consensus. The first-ever Africa Climate Summit amplified demands for a robust, fairer collective response to a warming planet — but fell short of forging a unified African position. Critically, it missed a chance to outline a strategy for dealing with the combined impacts of climate and violent conflicts.

Type: Analysis

EnvironmentFragility & Resilience

World Water Day: The Role of Nonviolent Action in Water Governance

World Water Day: The Role of Nonviolent Action in Water Governance

Monday, March 22, 2021

By: Jill Baggerman;  Emmanuel Davalillo Hidalgo

Will people go to war over water? According to the United Nations, “Water is the primary medium through which we will feel the effects of climate change” in the years ahead. As access to this finite, vital resource becomes increasingly imperiled, water-related tensions will rise — both between states and within them. In recent decades, disputes between governments and local stakeholders have resulted in mass action events centered on water governance. Today, in the age of accelerating climate change, nonviolent movements will need to adapt their strategic thinking if they are to improve water governance and prevent violent conflict.

Type: Analysis

Nonviolent ActionEnvironmentDemocracy & GovernanceEconomics

2021 Will See More Global Protest: Can It Remain Peaceful?

2021 Will See More Global Protest: Can It Remain Peaceful?

Thursday, January 21, 2021

By: Jonathan Pinckney, Ph.D.;  Emmanuel Davalillo Hidalgo

After years of steadily rising nonviolent action movements from 2009 to 2019, the eruption of the coronavirus 10 months ago forced an initial lull. But movements in virtually every region of the world soon rebounded—and while destructive riots periodically seized headlines, data show that public demonstrations in 2020 remained overwhelmingly peaceful. Evidence suggests that 2021 will continue to see high levels of mass mobilization. If anything, pandemic-driven economic recession and deepening inequalities are likely to spur increased demonstrations. It will be up to governments to respond in ways that can keep mass action peaceful and engage movements to redress their grievances.

Type: Analysis

Nonviolent Action

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