Twenty years ago, the U.N. Security Council sparked a global policy revolution when it recognized, for the first time, the unique experiences of women and girls in violent conflict. Resolution 1325, otherwise known as the Women, Peace, and Security agenda, laid a foundation for governments and civil society to place women at the center of peace processes—not only as victims, but as essential builders of peace. However, despite national action plans and legislation in 84 countries, women remain undervalued in peacebuilding and underrepresented in peace processes. Policymakers and practitioners must look beyond this policy framework first established two decades ago to achieve women’s meaningful participation in peace and security moving forward.

On October 20, USIP and the U.S. Civil Society Working Group on Women, Peace and Security marked the 20th anniversary of U.N. Security Council Resolution 1325. The discussion looked at how countries are expanding on the Women, Peace and Security agenda by adopting feminist foreign and development policies—and how civil society organizations have invested in masculinities programming as a complementary approach. These and other frameworks may prove more effective in advancing gender equality in peace and security, especially in light of the challenges posed by the coronavirus pandemic.

Continue the conversation on Twitter with #WomenAdvancePeace

Speakers

Ambassador Jacqueline O’Neill, pre-recorded remarks
Ambassador for Women, Peace and Security, Government of Canada

Ambassador Bonnie Jenkins
Founder and President, Women of Color Advancing Peace, Security and Conflict Transformation & Member of U.S. CSWG

Rita M. Lopidia
2020 USIP Women Building Peace Award Recipient & Executive Director and Co-Founder, Eve Organization for Women Development, South Sudan and Uganda

Sanam Naraghi Anderlini, MBE
Founder and CEO, International Civil Society Action Network (ICAN) & U.S. CSWG Member

Anthony Keedi
Masculinities Technical Advisor, ABAAD: Resource Center for Gender Equality, Lebanon

Kathleen Kuehnast, moderator
Director, Gender Policy and Strategy, U.S. Institute of Peace

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