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The U.S. Institute of Peace hosted a conversation with three of South Sudan’s leading civil society representatives, who shared their visions for how the country can move forward and recover from the recent turmoil and devastation.

Read the event analysis, South Sudan Activists Call for Civil Society Role in Peace Process

panel from event

Violence continues to tear South Sudan apart, while negotiations between the government and armed opposition have made little tangible progress. Furthermore, the coming rains could produce a humanitarian disaster. Amid deepening despair, it is more important than ever to listen to those who are not involved in the fighting. As a young country itself, South Sudan’s civil society is still nascent, but stands to play a critical role in addressing the current crisis and speak for people desperately seeking a better future.

  • Anyieth D’Awol
    Founder and Director, Roots Project South Sudan
  • David Deng
    Research Director, South Sudan Law Society
  • Isaac Gang
    Director of International Affairs, Alliance for South Sudanese in Diaspora (ASSD)
  • Jon Temin, Moderator
    Africa Program Director, U.S. Institute of Peace

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