Moscow is paying more attention to Africa now than any time since the Cold War. They have built a strong relationship with fellow BRICS member South Africa and stepped up diplomatic exchanges with the continent, including the second Russia-Africa summit slated for the end of July. Meanwhile, the Wagner mercenary group has used regional instability to expand its security foothold in conflict settings. Russian misinformation operations have also taken advantage of growing anti-European sentiment to manipulate African public opinion in service of Moscow’s political goals, such as winning African votes at the United Nations.

On July 19, USIP hosted a conversation on Russia’s growing footprint in Africa. The discussion examined Russia’s relations with African states — particularly regarding peace and security across the continent — as well as what to expect from the upcoming Russia-Africa Summit.

Continue the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #RussiaInAfricaUSIP.

Speakers

Joseph Siegle 
Director of Research, Africa Center for Strategic Studies

Amaka Anku 
Director, Africa Practice, Eurasia Group 

Catrina Doxsee
Associate Director and Associate Fellow, Transnational Threats Project, Center for Strategic and International Studies 

Thomas Sheehy, moderator 
Distinguished Fellow, Africa Center, U.S. Institute of Peace 

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