Afghanistan is on the front line of the international community’s struggle against terrorism while it also fights the Taliban insurgency. At the Kabul Process conference in Kabul this month, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani announced a peace offer to the Taliban that emphasized the role that the Taliban can play in a peaceful Afghanistan. At the end of this month, the Afghan government will participate in a regional peace conference in Tashkent, Uzbekistan to discuss how neighboring states can play a role in supporting stability in Afghanistan. These two events signal a new direction in efforts toward a peace process in Afghanistan.

In exploring this new direction, USIP hosted an invite-only discussion with Afghan National Security Adviser Mohammad Hanif Atmar which was webcasted live on Thursday, March 22nd from 10:30am to 11:30am. Please tune-in online as NSA Atmar discussed the security challenges in Afghanistan and the path to peace. Review the conversation on Twitter with #AfghanPeace.

Keynote Speaker

H.E. Mohammad Hanif Atmar
National Security Adviser of Afghanistan

Stephen J. HadleyModerator
Chair, U.S. Institute of Peace Board of Directors

Nancy Lindborg, Opening Remarks
President, U.S. Institute of Peace

Related Publications

How can Afghans make peace AND protect women? Meet Ayesha Aziz.

How can Afghans make peace AND protect women? Meet Ayesha Aziz.

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

By: Palwasha L. Kakar

After nearly 40 years of war, Afghanistan and the international community are urgently seeking paths for a peace process. But amid the tentative efforts—a three-day ceasefire in June, the peace march across the country by hundreds of Afghans and talks by U.S. envoy Zalmay Khalilzad—a somber question hangs for women and human rights advocates. How can Afghanistan make peace with the Taliban while protecting democracy and women’s rights?

Gender; Religion; Peace Processes

How to Secure Afghanistan’s Future

How to Secure Afghanistan’s Future

Monday, December 10, 2018

By: William Byrd

From a diplomatic and process standpoint, Geneva Conference on Afghanistan was generally seen as a success by participants (though some countries were not represented at the minister level), and the Afghan government showcased the progress it made in implementing reforms and national priority programs over the past two years. But what did the GCA accomplish substantively, what was left undone, and what questions were left unanswered?

Democracy & Governance; Economics & Environment

Johnny Walsh on Election Season in Afghanistan

Johnny Walsh on Election Season in Afghanistan

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

By: Johnny Walsh

As Afghans wait for official results from the parliamentary polls, Johnny Walsh says that the country is already entering “high political season” in preparation for the critical April 2019 presidential election. Although the Taliban continues to carry out high-profile attacks across the country, Walsh says that many Afghans are focused on the presidential polls and its implications for the peace process.

Democracy & Governance

View All Publications