Afghanistan is on the front line of the international community’s struggle against terrorism while it also fights the Taliban insurgency. At the Kabul Process conference in Kabul this month, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani announced a peace offer to the Taliban that emphasized the role that the Taliban can play in a peaceful Afghanistan. At the end of this month, the Afghan government will participate in a regional peace conference in Tashkent, Uzbekistan to discuss how neighboring states can play a role in supporting stability in Afghanistan. These two events signal a new direction in efforts toward a peace process in Afghanistan.

In exploring this new direction, USIP hosted an invite-only discussion with Afghan National Security Adviser Mohammad Hanif Atmar which was webcasted live on Thursday, March 22nd from 10:30am to 11:30am. Please tune-in online as NSA Atmar discussed the security challenges in Afghanistan and the path to peace. Review the conversation on Twitter with #AfghanPeace.

Keynote Speaker

H.E. Mohammad Hanif Atmar
National Security Adviser of Afghanistan

Stephen J. HadleyModerator
Chair, U.S. Institute of Peace Board of Directors

Nancy Lindborg, Opening Remarks
President, U.S. Institute of Peace

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