In support of the White House’s Summit for Democracy, USIP held a conversation with civil-society leaders from five democracies that are affected by diverse and challenging conflicts — Colombia, Iraq, Nigeria, the Philippines and Ukraine. The discussion examined the prospects for democracy and peace in these countries, how the goals of greater democracy and greater peace are linked, what lessons the leaders learned in joining together democracy and peace, and how the international democratic community can better support their efforts. Take part in the conversation on Twitter with #DemocracyandPeaceUSIP.

Speakers

Lise Grande, moderator
President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

Uzra Zeya, keynote remarks
Under Secretary of State for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights

Farhad Alaaldin
Chair, Iraq Advisory Council, Iraq

Maria Jimena Duzan
Host, “A Fondo” podcast, Colombia

Glenda Gloria
Executive Editor, Rappler, Philippines

Idayat Hassan
Director, Centre for Democracy and Development, Nigeria

Oleksandra Matviychuk
Chair, Center for Civil Liberties, Ukraine

Related Publications

 The Latest @ USIP: How to Stymie Guatemala’s Democratic Slide

The Latest @ USIP: How to Stymie Guatemala’s Democratic Slide

Wednesday, August 10, 2022

By: Ana María Méndez Dardón

In recent years, Guatemala’s democracy has faced a series of setbacks, following a troubling regional trend. Endemic corruption is a major challenge that has exacerbated inequality and driven mass migration to the United States. The Biden administration is prioritizing addressing insecurity in Central America. Arresting Guatemala’s democratic erosion will be vital to that effort. In this edition of "The Latest @ USIP,” Ana María Méndez Dardón, director for Central America at the Washington Office on Latin America, discusses the challenges facing civil society and independent journalists in Guatemala today, and explains how the United States can help protect democracy and promote human rights.

Type: Blog

Democracy & Governance

Pakistan’s New Government Struggles to Consolidate Control

Pakistan’s New Government Struggles to Consolidate Control

Tuesday, August 9, 2022

By: Cyril Almeida;  Colin Cookman;  Adnan Rafiq;  Tamanna Salikuddin;  Jumaina Siddiqui

Pakistan’s current government, an unwieldy multi-party coalition led by Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif of the Pakistan Muslim League Nawaz (PML-N) party, faced a new setback in July after losses in mid-month special elections for 20 constituencies in the country’s heartland province of Punjab. Although the PML-N coalition attempted to retain control of the provincial government through manuevers in the provincial assembly, a Supreme Court ruling on July 26 overturned earlier precedent and ordered the election of Chaudhry Pervaiz Elahi, an ally of former Prime Minister Imran Khan, to the position of chief minister.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & GovernanceEconomics

One Year Later, Taliban Unable to Reverse Afghanistan’s Economic Decline

One Year Later, Taliban Unable to Reverse Afghanistan’s Economic Decline

Monday, August 8, 2022

By: William Byrd, Ph.D.

Afghanistan’s economy was already deteriorating before the Taliban takeover of the country on August 15, 2021, suffering from severe drought, the COVID-19 pandemic, declining confidence in the previous government, falling international military spending as U.S. and other foreign troops left, human and capital flight, and Taliban advances on the battlefield. Then came the abrupt cutoff of civilian and security aid (more than $8 billion per year, equivalent to 40% of Afghanistan’s GDP) immediately after the Taliban takeover. No country in the world could have absorbed such an enormous economic shock — exacerbated by sanctions, the freezing of Afghanistan’s foreign exchange reserves and foreign banks’ reluctance to do business with the country.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & GovernanceEconomics

A Kenyan Peacebuilder Explains What’s at Stake in Her Country’s Elections

A Kenyan Peacebuilder Explains What’s at Stake in Her Country’s Elections

Thursday, August 4, 2022

By: Nicoletta Barbera;  Amriya Issa

Kenyans head to the polls on August 9 to vote for president, members of the National Assembly and Senate, and County Leadership for the country’s 47 counties. Elections are an important moment for any country, but the stakes are particularly high ahead for Kenya of Tuesday’s polls. Election violence has been a major issue in previous elections, and there are fears that this vote could spur conflict. Kenya’s next government will face significant challenges. Like many countries in the region, Kenya is suffering from a severe drought, rising debt and inflation, with food prices soaring by 15 percent in the last year. With the largest economy in East Africa, Kenya’s stability is critical for the wider region.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & GovernanceGender

View All Publications