In support of the White House’s Summit for Democracy, USIP held a conversation with civil-society leaders from five democracies that are affected by diverse and challenging conflicts — Colombia, Iraq, Nigeria, the Philippines and Ukraine. The discussion examined the prospects for democracy and peace in these countries, how the goals of greater democracy and greater peace are linked, what lessons the leaders learned in joining together democracy and peace, and how the international democratic community can better support their efforts. Take part in the conversation on Twitter with #DemocracyandPeaceUSIP.

Speakers

Lise Grande, moderator
President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

Uzra Zeya, keynote remarks
Under Secretary of State for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights

Farhad Alaaldin
Chair, Iraq Advisory Council, Iraq

Maria Jimena Duzan
Host, “A Fondo” podcast, Colombia

Glenda Gloria
Executive Editor, Rappler, Philippines

Idayat Hassan
Director, Centre for Democracy and Development, Nigeria

Oleksandra Matviychuk
Chair, Center for Civil Liberties, Ukraine

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