Kirk Randolph is a program officer for the Latin America program at USIP.

In this role, she contributes analysis on drivers of conflict in the Western Hemisphere and implements programs aimed at preventing, mitigating and resolving conflict. She joined USIP after serving seven years with the U.S. Air Force as a contracting officer.

Kirk holds a master’s in international relations from American University’s School of International Service and a bachelor’s in economics from the U.S. Air Force Academy.

Publications By Kirk

How to Avert a Gang Takeover of Haiti

How to Avert a Gang Takeover of Haiti

Thursday, March 7, 2024

By: Nicolás Devia-Valbuena;  Keith Mines;  Kirk Randolph

Policymakers across the Western Hemisphere were shocked this weekend by news of a concerted effort by a coalition of gangs to attack Haiti’s key infrastructure, block the capital’s airport and prevent Prime Minister Ariel Henry from returning from a trip abroad. After all, the analysis went, Henry’s position seemed cemented as the deadline of February 7 — when he was supposed to hand over power to an elected government — passed with no real challenges to his rule. Now, absent an inclusive transitional arrangement that can effectively govern, the possibility of total collapse and anarchy in Haiti is ever more real.

Type: Analysis

Global Policy

What BRICS Expansion Means for the Bloc’s Founding Members

What BRICS Expansion Means for the Bloc’s Founding Members

Wednesday, August 30, 2023

By: Heather Ashby, Ph.D.;  Daniel Markey, Ph.D.;  Kirk Randolph;  Kirtika Sharad;  Henry Tugendhat;  Aly Verjee

After more than 40 countries expressed interest in joining, the question of whether BRICS would admit new members was finally answered during the group’s summit last week. Despite pre-summit reports of division over the potential expansion, leaders from the five-nation bloc announced that Saudi Arabia, Iran, Ethiopia, Egypt, Argentina and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) would join the group starting in 2024.

Type: Analysis

Global Policy

To Protect the Amazon, Target Transnational Criminal Networks

To Protect the Amazon, Target Transnational Criminal Networks

Thursday, August 24, 2023

By: Kayly Ober;  Kirk Randolph

Earlier this month, Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, often referred to as “Lula,” resurrected the moribund Amazon Cooperation Treaty Organization (ACTO) with the group’s first summit in 14 years. Originally formed in 1995, ACTO was intended as a regional forum for its eight member-states to coordinate efforts to protect the Amazon rainforest. But prior to this month's meeting in Belém, Brazil, the organization had been mostly dormant since Lula’s first stint as Brazil’s president ended in 2010.

Type: Analysis

EnvironmentGlobal Policy

Lavrov in Latin America: Russia’s Bid for a Multipolar World

Lavrov in Latin America: Russia’s Bid for a Multipolar World

Thursday, April 27, 2023

By: Kirk Randolph

This past week, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov completed a four-country tour of Latin America to reinforce Moscow’s alliances and foster growing partnerships in the region. During the trip, Lavrov met with the heads of state of Brazil, Venezuela, Nicaragua and Cuba in their respective countries, as well as another meeting with Bolivian emissaries during his stop in Venezuela. Lavrov used the opportunity to emphasize the key tenet of Russia’s newest foreign policy concept that was launched in the past month and is shared by regional powers like Brazil: The world is experiencing a revolution in which Western power is weakening and a new multipolar world is emerging.

Type: Analysis

Global Policy

View All