Each year, USIP presents the Women Building Peace Award to an exceptional woman peacebuilder creating change in her country. This year’s awardee and finalists demonstrate an extraordinary breadth of experience, vision and skill mediating between armed actors, breaking cycles of gender-based violence, empowering women and youth, and helping their communities heal from trauma. 

WBPA Winners

Ahead of International Women’s Day and on the first day of Women’s History Month, join USIP for a conversation with the awardee and finalists for the 2023 Women Building Peace Award. The conversation will explore how these four fearless women from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Haiti, Kenya and Syria are making history while working for a peaceful future. 

Speakers

Megan Beyer, moderator 
Director, Office of Art in Embassies, U.S. Department of State; Co-Chair, USIP’s Women Building Peace Award Council

Pétronille Vaweka 
Awardee, 2023 Women Building Peace Award; Senior Mediator and Coordinator, Centre Femmes Engagées pour la Paix en Afrique (Democratic Republic of the Congo)

Dr. Marie-Marcelle H. Deschamps 
Finalist, 2023 Women Building Peace Award; Deputy Executive Director, Les Centres GHESKIO, (Haiti)

Abir Haj Ibrahim 
Finalist, 2023 Women Building Peace Award; Co-Founder and Executive Manager, Mobaderoon (Syria) 

Hamisa Zaja 
Finalist, 2023 Women Building Peace Award; Founder and CEO, Coast Association for Persons with Disabilities (Kenya)

General Registration

Media Registration

Your Information
Work Information
How did you hear about this event?

For questions about accessibility please contact EventRegistration@usip.org. Kindly provide at least three business days advance notice of need for accommodations.

Related Publications

Can the DRC Hold Free and Fair Elections Amid Mass Displacement?

Can the DRC Hold Free and Fair Elections Amid Mass Displacement?

Tuesday, December 19, 2023

By: Wapoenje T. Dacruz Evora;  Elizabeth Murray

On December 20, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is holding its first elections since the peaceful — but contested — transfer of power in 2019 from former President Joseph Kabila to current President Felix Tshisekedi. The elections come amid a climate of instability throughout the country, underpinned by conflict in the eastern regions, economic and social crises, and mistrust between the government and opposition. USIP’s Wapoenje Dacruz Evora and Elizabeth Murray examine the major candidates and the issues most important to voters, the risk for violence during the electoral process, and whether free and fair elections are possible given the mass displacement of civilians in the eastern DRC.

Type: Analysis

Democracy & Governance

Challenging China’s Grip on Critical Minerals Can Be a Boon for Africa’s Future

Challenging China’s Grip on Critical Minerals Can Be a Boon for Africa’s Future

Wednesday, June 7, 2023

By: Edward A. Burrier;  Thomas P. Sheehy

Demand for the critical minerals powering the world’s clean-energy technologies, consumer goods and defense applications is skyrocketing. These metals are what the modern economy runs on: we need them for our phones, electric vehicles and satellites, and so much more. Forecasts estimate that in the coming decades, the world will need many times more cobalt, copper, lithium and manganese, among other minerals, than what is currently being produced. .

Type: Analysis

EconomicsEnvironment

The Latest @ USIP: Religious Actors Work Together for Peace in the DRC

The Latest @ USIP: Religious Actors Work Together for Peace in the DRC

Wednesday, May 24, 2023

By: Reverend Eric Nsenga;  Monsignor Donatien Nshole

Religious leaders in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) are banding together to help prevent conflict and violence ahead of elections planned for later this year. Monsignor Donatien Nshole and Reverend Eric Nsenga, who represent two of the largest church organizations in the country, discuss their efforts to support better governance in the DRC, what’s blocking political agreements from being implemented, and the importance of civic engagement at the local level to maintain peace.

Type: Blog

Democracy & GovernancePeace ProcessesReligion

Saving Congo’s Forests Means Changing ‘Law Enforcement’

Saving Congo’s Forests Means Changing ‘Law Enforcement’

Thursday, December 22, 2022

By: Judith Verweijen

The Congo Basin rainforests, the world’s second largest, form the planet’s single greatest “carbon sink,” absorbing the atmospheric carbon dioxide that is overheating our planet. Yet this crucial front line against climate change is threatened by illegal and industrial logging, mining, oil and gas concessions and ongoing warfare in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). To save the rich and unique ecosystems of the Congo Basin forests, policies are needed to stop destructive resource exploitation and ongoing violence. This includes devising more effective, holistic approaches to upholding conservation laws in national parks and other protected areas.

Type: Analysis

Environment

View All Publications