The European Union recently has added a new priority to its foreign and defense policies: Help countries vulnerable to crisis build their resilience against catastrophic events, notably violent conflict, which has uprooted 65 million people worldwide. The EU’s shift is part of a growing global focus on the importance of preventing civil war and its devastation. The United Nations, World Bank and U.S. government are among the organizations taking up this agenda. On November 30, USIP gathered U.S., European and World Bank officials to discuss how governments and international organizations can better coordinate the implementation of this broad new approach to halting violent conflicts.

The European Union issued its new framework for policy this year as the World Bank and United Nations are completing a broad study on ways to catalyze the international community to better prevent violent conflicts. Concurrently, the State Department and other U.S. agencies are reviewing the United States’ efforts to help states struggling for stability in the face of warfare. As governments and international organizations improve these strategies, where are the obstacles to better coordination? Christian Leffler of the European Union will open this discussion by laying out the new EU policy framework.

Continue the conversation on Twitter with #ResilienceIdeas.

Speakers

Joe Hewitt, moderator
Vice President, Planning, Learning and Strategy, U.S. Institute of Peace

Alexandre Marc
Chief Specialist, Fragility, Conflict, and Violence Group, World Bank

Raphael Carland
Managing Director, Office of Foreign Resource Assistance, State Department

Christian Leffler
Deputy Secretary General of the European External Action Service, European Union

Nancy Lindborg
President, U.S. Institute of Peace

Mark Swayne
Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Stability and Humanitarian Affairs, Defense Department

Related Publications

Libya’s Migrant Crisis Isn’t Just a European Problem

Libya’s Migrant Crisis Isn’t Just a European Problem

Friday, November 9, 2018

By: Thomas M. Hill; Emily Estelle

Next week, Italy will host an international conference intended to finally bring Libya’s bloody seven-year conflict toward resolution. Since the ouster of Muammar Qaddafi in 2011, successive U.S. administrations have watched Libya’s continuing collapse, believing that the country’s unraveling threatens only Europe. This is a mistake.

Fragility & Resilience

Terrorism has “Changed Dramatically” Since 9/11, Experts say Bipartisan Solutions Needed

Terrorism has “Changed Dramatically” Since 9/11, Experts say Bipartisan Solutions Needed

Thursday, September 13, 2018

By: USIP Staff

Despite counterterrorism efforts that have “thwarted dozens of plots and thoroughly disrupted terrorist capabilities,” we “cannot rest” in our efforts to prevent violent extremism, said Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats Tuesday night at an event at the U.S. Institute of Peace. The event, co-hosted by USIP and the Bipartisan Policy Center on the 17th anniversary of 9/11, recognized 9/11 Commission chairs Gov. Thomas Kean and Rep. Lee Hamilton for their work leading the Commission and for continuing this work through the Task Force on Extremism in Fragile States.

Fragility & Resilience

Nancy Lindborg on Addressing Extremism in Fragile States

Nancy Lindborg on Addressing Extremism in Fragile States

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

By: Nancy Lindborg

Seventeen years after the 9/11 attacks, Nancy Lindborg details the findings of an interim report from the congressionally mandated Task Force on Extremism in Fragile States. Convened by USIP, the Task Force will devise a comprehensive new strategy for addressing the underlying causes of extremism in fragile states, says Lindborg, a member of the Task Force.

Fragility & Resilience

View All Publications