Former Afghanistan Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah was recently named chairman of the newly established High Council for National Reconciliation (HCNR), which will oversee the talks with the Taliban. The move ends a prolonged dispute over the 2019 presidential election results and has helped pave the way for the first-ever direct talks between representatives of the Taliban and the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan.

USIP was pleased to host Dr. Abdullah for his first public event as chairman of the HCNR. Dr. Abdullah discussed preparations for negotiations with the Taliban, the key issues that need to be addressed, and what can be done to strengthen national unity and consensus on peace. His address was followed by a live question and answer session. 

Download the complete transcript

Speakers

His Excellency Dr. Abdullah Abdullah, keynote address 
Chairman, High Council for National Reconciliation, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan 

The Honorable Nancy Lindborg, welcoming remarks
President & CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

Dr. Andrew Wilder, moderator
Vice President, Asia Center, U.S. Institute of Peace

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