Nandan Nilekani is the co-founder of Infosys and former chairman of Aadhaar, India’s massive biometric identification system. The U.S. Institute of Peace, PeaceTech Lab and emerge85 discussed with Nilekani on India’s emerging data economy, which seeks to restore individuals’ control over their personal data while fueling public and private sector innovation. He highlighted India’s emerging data governance model, the Data Empowerment and Protection Architecture, which aims to safeguard private data while making it possible for citizens to safely share their information to access benefits like affordable credit and improved health care.

Exploring this new paradigm is important not just for India. In today’s increasingly data-focused environment, discovering how to effectively and safely utilize data is particularly relevant for developing countries, where many users will become data-rich before becoming economically-rich. Data is a key focus of international development and governance efforts. Organizations and governments worldwide are harnessing data to improve delivery of goods and services, increase communication, and bolster accountability, but there are challenges. Data privacy is coming to heads with effectively utilizing data, and expert analysis and understanding is needed to begin resolving this conflict. This program taught individuals in the fields of governance and development how to fully harness data while protecting individual identity and information.

Review the conversation on Twitter by using the hashtag #DataDemocracy.

Speakers

Nandan Nilekani, Featured Speaker
Co-Founder, Infosys

Sheldon Himelfarb, Moderator
Founder & CEO, PeaceTech Lab

Related Publications

Combatting Religious Discrimination in India and Beyond

Combatting Religious Discrimination in India and Beyond

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

By: Jason Klocek

Last month, the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom listed India as a “country of particular concern” for the first time since 2004. The decision reflects increased religious hostility and sectarian conflict in India, which have been stoked further by the Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA) passed last December. In the five months since, the CAA’s use of religious identity as a criteria for citizenship has sparked widespread opposition and protest both within India and abroad. But while controversial, it is far from an isolated policy. It connects to a steady increase in religious discrimination and violence within India, throughout South Asia, and across the globe—raising important questions for policymakers and activists alike.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Religion

Can India Help Bring Peace to Afghanistan?

Can India Help Bring Peace to Afghanistan?

Tuesday, April 21, 2020

By: Belquis Ahmadi; Vikram J. Singh

After February’s landmark U.S.-Taliban framework agreement, Afghanistan is still trying to initiate the next steps of their peace process, including intra-Afghan talks and prisoner exchanges. The country’s regional neighbors will be critical to the success or failure of the proposed talks. And while most attention naturally goes to Pakistan, with some focus also given to Iran and China, U.S. Special Representative Zalmay Khalilzad has made clear that India also has a vital role to play.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Peace Processes

Four Things to Know About President Trump’s Trip to India

Four Things to Know About President Trump’s Trip to India

Thursday, February 27, 2020

By: Vikram J. Singh

President Trump’s recent trip to India yielded no progress on a bilateral trade agreement, one of the main issues both leaders hoped to address. Despite the trade impasse, both President Trump and Indian Prime Minister Narenda Modi used the two-day trip to reinforce the positive relationship between the U.S. and India, as official discussions finalized several defense and energy deals. USIP’s Vikram Singh looks at the state of trade talks, the possibility of U.S. mediation in Kashmir, India’s regional stance on the Afghan peace process, and how China’s growing global influence impacts U.S.-India relations.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

Vikram Singh on President Trump’s Trip to India

Vikram Singh on President Trump’s Trip to India

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

By: Vikram J. Singh

The visit did not yield a bilateral trade agreement, as many hoped it would. But USIP’s Vikram Singh says that despite the trade impasse, the trip did deliver defense and energy deals and reinforced “the symbolism of this partnership continuing to grow basically as it has for the entire 21st century.”

Type: Podcast

Global Policy

View All Publications