Afghanistan’s peace process has faced hurdles—some familiar, some new—in recent months. There is increased hope that long-awaited negotiations between the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and the Taliban will begin imminently. But despite recent momentum following the Eid cease-fire at the end of July and the Loya Jirga organized by President Ghani at the beginning of August, major barriers remain ahead of talks. The levels of violence against Afghan security forces and civilians remain at unsustainable levels, and continued disputes over prisoner releases may delay the process further. 

The lead up to intra-Afghan talks has made it clear that a sustainable peace in Afghanistan will require intensive international and regional support, both during negotiations and following any political settlement. Afghanistan’s acting Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mohammed Haneef Atmar, has led Afghanistan’s efforts to consolidate international support for the peace process in Afghanistan—including diverse neighbors, regional powers, and supportive western nations.

On August 27, USIP hosted Minister Atmar for a virtual discussion about the Afghanistan peace process as talks with the Taliban get set to begin. The foreign minister spoke about the Afghan government’s ongoing efforts for peace and stability, as well as the role of the regional and international community in supporting peace efforts. 

Join the conversation with #AfghanPeace.

Speakers

H.E Mohammed Haneef Atmar
Acting Minister of Foreign Affairs, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

Andrew Wilder, moderator
Vice President, Asia Center, U.S. Institute of Peace 

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