Too often, peace processes only include dueling parties—leaving women; religious, indigenous, and ethnic groups; youth; and survivors of violence excluded from critical discussions that shape the future landscape of a country. Yet, sidelining their voices often results in a resurgence of conflict and fails to achieve comprehensive or sustainable peace.

The U.S. Institute of Peace and Conciliation Resources held a discussion on overcoming challenges to inclusive peace processes and negotiated settlements. This event furthered policy conversations supported by evidence-based research on inclusion in peace efforts conducted by Conciliation Resources.

The research draws on case studies and local perspectives with local partners from Colombia, Bougainville and Nepal. The event will explore how inclusion is negotiated in war to peace transitions, common barriers to and trade-offs between inclusion and stability, and types of external and internal support that have been effective. The findings will also reflect upon strategies used by different groups, in particular women and other marginalized groups, to influence these processes. Review the conversation on Twitter with #InclusivePeace.

9:45am-10:00am: Registration

10:00am-10:10am: Opening Remarks  

10:10am-10:15am: Introduction by Moderator

10:15am-10:35am: Presentation of Findings

  • Zahbia Yousuf
    Senior Advisor, Peace and Transition Process, Conciliation Resources
  • Sophia Close
    Senior Advisor, Gender and Peacebuilding, Conciliation Resources

10:35am-10:50am: Application and Experiences on the Ground

  • Deepak Thapa
    Director, Social Science Baha Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Rosa Emilia Salamanca
    Director, Institute for Social and Economic Research and Action (CIASE) Bogota, Colombia

10:50am-11:05am: Policy Implications

  • Esra Cuhadar 
    JR Senior Fellow, U.S. Institute of Peace 
  • Jennifer Marron
    Peace Process Advisor, Bureau of Conflict Stabilization and Operations, Department of State

11:05-11:30am: Questions and Answers

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