The search for peace has become a central focus of Afghanistan policy in Washington and for Kabul. Afghan President Ashraf Ghani offered the Taliban constitutional reform and status as a legitimate political party in late February on the condition that the group makes peace. In recent months, the Taliban have also publicly offered talks with the United States and prominent Afghan powerbrokers, and high-profile peace demonstrations in conflict-torn Helmand province have spread across much of the country.

The U.S. Institute of Peace, in conjunction with Rise to Peace, hosted a panel of distinguished experts explore the prospects for peace and Afghanistan’s larger trajectory. Review the conversation on Twitter with #AfghanPeace.

Speakers

Ambassador Timothy Carney
Former U.S. Ambassador to Sudan and Haiti

John Wood
Associate Professor, National Defense University and former U.S. National Security Council Senior Director for Afghanistan

Johnny Walsh
Senior Expert, Afghanistan, U.S. Institute of Peace and former U.S. Department of State lead for Afghan reconciliation

Courtney Cooper
International Affairs Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations and former U.S. National Security Council Director for Afghanistan

Ahmad Mohibi
Founder and President, Rise to Peace

Michael Sherwin, Moderator
Assistant United States Attorney, U.S. Department of Justice and former U.S. Navy Intelligence Officer

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