Este curso introduce a los participantes al diálogo como un proceso práctico y eficaz para promover la transformación de conflictos y la construcción de la paz a nivel comunitario. El objetivo del curso es diseñar e implementar un proceso de diálogo relevante, sostenible y significativo.

group of women wearing masks participating in a USIP dialogue
Photo by USIP

Este curso se enfoca exclusivamente en cómo diseñar e implementar un proceso de diálogo con las partes interesadas en un contexto específico de conflicto. No es un curso sobre cómo facilitar el diálogo. En el USIP creemos firmemente que la facilitación se debe aprender a través de la capacitación en persona, donde se pueden aprender, practicar y aplicar las habilidades bajo el consejo de profesionales experimentados.

Los temas que abarca son:

  • Definiciones de diálogo;
  • Principios que guían el proceso de diálogo basado en la comunidad;
  • Consideraciones para el diseño, el monitoreo y la evaluación de un proceso de diálogo; y
  • Las partes interesadas en un proceso de diálogo: sus roles y motivaciones.

Agenda

  • Definiciones
  • Diseño
  • Inclusión
  • Monitoreo y evaluación

Instructores del curso

  • Alison Milofsky, Former Directora de Currículo y Diseño de Capacitación, United States Institute of Peace
  • Ariana Barth, Fomer Oficial de Programa, United States Institute of Peace

Related Publications

 70 Years After the Geneva Conference: Why is the Korean Peninsula No Closer to Peace?

70 Years After the Geneva Conference: Why is the Korean Peninsula No Closer to Peace?

Monday, July 22, 2024

July marks the anniversary of the 1953 armistice agreement that ended the Korean War and the 1954 Geneva Conference, convened to resolve the issues that the war could not. In the seven decades since, efforts to achieve peace on the Korean Peninsula have been limited and flawed. Today, the security situation in the region is arguably more precarious than ever, with a nuclear armed-North Korea and dysfunctional great power relations. Recent foreign policy shifts in North Korea do not augur well for peace in the near term. Thus, even moving the needle toward peace will likely require Washington to undertake bold initiatives.

Type: Question and Answer

Mediation, Negotiation & DialoguePeace Processes

USIP Explains: Community Dialogue in Northern Sinjar

USIP Explains: Community Dialogue in Northern Sinjar

Thursday, April 11, 2024

Ten years after ISIS’ genocide against them, the wounds of the Yazidi community in Iraq’s Sinjar district remain fresh as thousands remain displaced and even more await justice for the crimes perpetrated against them. Meanwhile, despite living in peaceful coexistence prior to ISIS’ campaign, the conflict planted seeds of division among Sinjar’s various tribes and communities — resulting in tensions that threatened to tear the district apart even after ISIS’ defeat.

Type: Blog

Mediation, Negotiation & DialoguePeace Processes

Report of the Expert Study Group on NATO and Indo-Pacific Partners

Report of the Expert Study Group on NATO and Indo-Pacific Partners

Monday, February 19, 2024

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and its four partner countries in the Indo-Pacific—Australia, Japan, the Republic of Korea (ROK), and New Zealand—have entered a period of increased engagement. This engagement is taking shape in the context of the war waged by the Russian Federation (Russia) against Ukraine, NATO’s growing awareness of the security challenges posed by the People’s Republic of China (China), and important structural changes in the international system, including the return of strategic competition between the United States and China and Russia. It is occurring not only in bilateral NATO-partner relations but also between NATO and these Indo-Pacific countries as a group.

Type: Report

Conflict Analysis & PreventionCivilian-Military RelationsGlobal PolicyMediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

Why Now? The Tortured History of Iran’s Hostage Seizures

Why Now? The Tortured History of Iran’s Hostage Seizures

Wednesday, September 20, 2023

In January 1981, I stood at the foot of the Air Algerie flight that flew 52 American diplomats to freedom after 444 days as hostages in Iran. Some of them were my friends. I still remember their gaunt appearances after being caged and cut off from the world for so long as they quietly disembarked. That original hostage crisis was a turning point in U.S. history in the 20th century — and has shaped angry American views of the Islamic republic ever since.

Type: Analysis

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

View All Publications