From a campaign for peaceful elections in Afghanistan to a radio program engaging youth in South Sudan, USIP worked with civil society, political leaders and others in 2014 on a range of actions to prevent, mitigate or resolve violent conflict during a particularly chaotic year in global affairs. Top USIP experts discuss highlights of the year and glance ahead at 2015.

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In addition to the work spotlighted in the video, USIP’s initiatives in 2014 included training for civil society leaders on non-violent civic mobilization, and support for dialogues between communities and police to address local justice and security issues like extremism and cross-border crime. The institute aided civic activists backing peace talks between the government and rebel forces in Colombia, and brought religious leaders together with advocates for women and legal experts in multiple countries to help counter violent extremism and promote peaceful, moderate understandings of faith traditions.

Research by young scholars backed by USIP informed a major international conference on sexual violence by combatting myths like the idea that such assaults in war zones are inevitable. And the second annual “Peace Game” in Washington gathered 40 experts for role playing and analysis on countering violent extremism, highlighting the great risks of violence surrounding Nigeria’s upcoming election in 2015.

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Note: Note: The Tabeir Iraq map shown in this video is a project funded by SIDA and implemented by the Iraq Foundation. The project had initially included data from the Iraqi Rights Defense Journalists Association, a PeaceTech Exchange Participant.

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