This peace brief describes the security challenges facing eastern Chad and the pending withdrawal of the United Nations Mission in the Central African Republic and Chad.

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Summary

  • Chad hosts over 249,000 refugees from the Darfur conflict and 168,000 internally displaced persons who were relocated after instability caused by Chadian rebel groups.
  • The U.N. Mission in the Central African Republic and Chad has been reduced to 1,900 as of October 15, 2010. It will withdraw completely by December 31, 2010. There are concerns about the capacity of the Chadian security forces to adequately protect the population.
  • The government of Chad and the international community must work to ensure the security of the population and humanitarian workers.

About this Brief

This peace brief describes the security challenges facing eastern Chad and the pending withdrawal of the United Nations Mission in the Central African Republic and Chad. Erin Weir is a Senior Advocate for Peacekeeping at Refugees International. This Peace Brief is part of a series on Chad, originally presented at a conference organized by USIP and the International Peace Institute on May 20, 2010. USIP Senior Research Associate Dorina Bekoe wrote the first Peace Brief of this series, “Stabilizing Chad: Security, Governance and Development Challenges.”

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