The Women Preventing Extremist Violence (WPEV) is a pilot project of the USIP’s Gender and Peacebuilding team designed to increase women’s agency, influence and engagement in strengthening community level resilience to violent extremism. Through a training program and facilitated dialogues, USIP’s staff works with in-country partners to bring together representatives of women civil society and the security sector in an exploration of the local drivers of violent extremism, and potential strategies for prevention and improved collaboration. 

International Women's Day 2008 in Korgnegane, Bougouriba Province in the Burkina Faso
Photo Courtesy of Wiki Commons/Hugues

The WPEV project is currently being piloted in Nigeria and Kenya. A first series of workshops brought together a dozen women leaders of civil society organizations. A second series of dialogues sought to foster trust and communication between civil society and representatives of the police. The WPEV project culminated with an international symposium in March 2015 that highlighted the work of women civil society leaders from India, Indonesia, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Tanzania, who presented their lessons learned and innovative ways to engage women in preventing extremist violence at the community level.

coverThe Thought for Action Kit

A collection of experts’ essays and exercises, designed to help guide activists and practitioners to engage in reflection and dialogue on violent extremism. 

Events

Women and Countering Violent Extremism Strengthening Policy Responses and Ensuring Inclusivity

In July 2015, experts from civil society, the United Nations, academia, and the U.S. government discussed ways to include women in efforts to counter violent extremism. The debate directly informed U.S. government officials preparing for major international conferences on these issues in fall 2015.

Women Preventing Violent Extremism: Charting a New Course

In celebration of International Women's Day, the U.S. Institute of Peace hosted a meeting of 12 women civil society leaders from India, Indonesia, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan and Tanzania on Friday, March 6.

Related Publications

Measuring Up: Monitoring and Evaluating P/CVE Programs

Measuring Up: Monitoring and Evaluating P/CVE Programs

Thursday, September 6, 2018

By: Georgia Holmer; Peter Bauman; Kateira Aryaeinejad

This report considers the various conceptual and practical challenges in measuring the impact and value of programs designed to prevent and counter violent extremism (P/CVE). It examines potential solutions and emphasizes the significance of efforts to assess changes in attitudes, behaviors, and relationships.

Violent Extremism

Taking Stock: Analytic Tools for Understanding and Designing P/CVE Programs

Taking Stock: Analytic Tools for Understanding and Designing P/CVE Programs

Thursday, September 6, 2018

By: Georgia Holmer; Peter Bauman

This report examines the various analytic tools that have been developed to understand the causes and dynamics of radicalization and violent extremism. The report assesses the strengths and limitations of these tools in informing the design of P/CVE interventions. It considers micro- and macro-level frameworks and models, and the various contexts in which they may be relevant.

Violent Extremism

Mona Yacoubian on Syria

Mona Yacoubian on Syria

Thursday, August 9, 2018

By:

As the Assad regime consolidates power across Syria, Mona Yacoubian says that regime change is increasingly unlikely seven years into the civil war. But, the conflict remains complex, as the U.S. and coalition forces continue to work to eradicate remnants of ISIS and Israel becomes increasingly concerned over Iran’s military presence in neighboring Syria.

Violent Extremism; Global Policy

How Saving Rhinos Can Cut Poverty—and Even Terrorists’ Funds

How Saving Rhinos Can Cut Poverty—and Even Terrorists’ Funds

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

By: Fred Strasser

By 2030 African black rhinos and elephants could face extinction as poachers and other criminals, including violent extremist groups, sell rhino horns and ivory to largely Asian markets. The trade in protected wildlife, worth an estimated $7 to $10 billion annually, not only endangers these species, it destabilizes communities and impedes sustainable economic development.

Economics & Environment; Violent Extremism

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