On Thursday, December 9, 2010, the U.S. Institute of Peace and the Center for International Policy co-hosted a day-long roundtable session on “Stabilization and Development: Lessons of Colombia‘s ‘Consolidation’ Model.” This off-the-record, invitation-only discussion explored the successes and limitations of Colombia’s “Consolidation” or “Integrated Action” model.

Marcha en Colombia
Photo Courtesy of Flickr/Alejandro Cortes

This off-the-record, invitation-only discussion explored the successes and limitations of Colombia’s “Consolidation” or “Integrated Action” model.

The roundtable took place at the U.S. Institute of Peace with more than 80 participants and panelists from U.S. and Colombian government, non-government, development, military, policy, and academic circles.  Practitioners provided diverse historic and geographic perspectives on stabilization, development, and peacebuilding models in Colombia and beyond. 

The meeting provided a unique and unprecedented opportunity for architects, implementers, and critics to discuss the challenges of the model and to begin to identify lessons from their experiences.  Roundtable participants debated how best to support sustainable development in areas that have been or are wracked by violence. 

A report on the conference identifies lessons from the Colombian model and will be available at this site in coming weeks. 

Explore Further

Related Publications

To Stabilize Iraq After ISIS, Help Iraqis Reconcile

To Stabilize Iraq After ISIS, Help Iraqis Reconcile

Sunday, February 11, 2018

By: USIP Staff; Nancy Lindborg; Sarhang Hamasaeed

An international conference opens in Kuwait Monday to plan ways to rebuild Iraq and secure it against renewed extremist violence following the three-year war against ISIS. A USIP team just spent nine days in Iraq for talks with government and civil society leaders, part of the Institute’s years-long effort to help the country stabilize. The Kuwait conference will gather government, business and civil society leaders to consider a reconstruction that Iraq has said could cost $100 billion. USIP’s president, Nancy Lindborg, and Middle East program director, Sarhang Hamasaeed, say any realistic rebuilding plan must focus also on the divisions and grievances in Iraq that led to ISIS’ violence and that still exist.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Violent Extremism

A New U.S. Strategy Will Keep American Troops in Syria

A New U.S. Strategy Will Keep American Troops in Syria

Thursday, January 18, 2018

By: USIP Staff; Mona Yacoubian

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has outlined a new Syria strategy for the Trump administration that includes an extended U.S. troop presence. Tillerson spoke days after Turkey, a NATO ally, denounced a U.S. plan to create a Border Security Force in Syria composed heavily of ethnic Kurds. Mona Yacoubian, a longtime analyst and policy specialist on Syria and the Middle East, discusses the implications of these developments.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

View All Publications