On Thursday, December 9, 2010, the U.S. Institute of Peace and the Center for International Policy co-hosted a day-long roundtable session on “Stabilization and Development: Lessons of Colombia‘s ‘Consolidation’ Model.” This off-the-record, invitation-only discussion explored the successes and limitations of Colombia’s “Consolidation” or “Integrated Action” model.

Marcha en Colombia
Photo Courtesy of Flickr/Alejandro Cortes

This off-the-record, invitation-only discussion explored the successes and limitations of Colombia’s “Consolidation” or “Integrated Action” model.

The roundtable took place at the U.S. Institute of Peace with more than 80 participants and panelists from U.S. and Colombian government, non-government, development, military, policy, and academic circles.  Practitioners provided diverse historic and geographic perspectives on stabilization, development, and peacebuilding models in Colombia and beyond. 

The meeting provided a unique and unprecedented opportunity for architects, implementers, and critics to discuss the challenges of the model and to begin to identify lessons from their experiences.  Roundtable participants debated how best to support sustainable development in areas that have been or are wracked by violence. 

A report on the conference identifies lessons from the Colombian model and will be available at this site in coming weeks. 

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