The Peace Day Challenge exists to raise the profile of the International Day of Peace and to affirm peace as a real alternative to the violence we see every day in the world. It is all about inspiring a day of action on September 21, focused on building peace through real-life activities and sharing on social media at #PeaceDayChallenge.

Since launching in 2015, the Peace Day Challenge has reached 148 countries and all 50 U.S. states, engaged hundreds of schools and dozens of organizations, and inspired social media posts from high-profile individuals and a broad public audience reaching tens of millions of people.

Who Inspired you? Peace Day Challenge 2021

Profiles in Peacebuilding

After a tumultuous 2020 and in still-challenging times of conflict and global threats, this year’s Peace Day Challenge focuses on Profiles in Peacebuilding—elevating stories of peacebuilders from different parts of the world and different walks of life, their resilience and impact, and the inspiration they provide to all of us. Over the next few weeks, USIP will be sharing stories of peacebuilders from across our network—and we’re asking YOU to join us!

Tell us about a peacebuilder who inspires you. Share their story on social media using #PeaceDayChallenge and help us elevate the profiles of individual peacebuilders in our communities and around the world.

Here are some resources to help you find inspiration:

  • Browse USIP’s Olive Branch Blog and find a story of peacebuilding that inspires you.
  • Think about someone in your own life who motivates you to make a difference and encourages you to manage conflict nonviolently.
  • Read about USIP’s 10 finalists for the 2020 Women Building Peace Award.
  • Explore the United Nations’ International Day of Peace page.
  • Reflect on historical figures that you believe embody peacebuilding.
  • Talk to your friends, family, teachers, faith leaders and other members of your community about their peacebuilding heroes.
  • Read about some of USIP’s peacebuilding projects in places like Nigeria, Pakistan, Colombia and more.

Explore our virtual gallery in the Great Hall of our headquarters in Washington, D.C., featuring our Profiles in Peacebuilding, then use social media to post your own profile of a peacebuilder who inspires you!

No matter which peacebuilder you choose to elevate, share their story, quotes, photos, videos and more on social media and be sure to use the hashtag #PeaceDayChallenge!

    More Ideas for Action

    • Engage in an act of volunteerism or service to help those in need. In addition to opportunities that may be available in your own community, explore Points of Light’s Virtual Volunteer Opportunities.
    • Hold a virtual event or activity to mark the International Day of Peace and raise awareness about  issues of peace and conflict that matter to you.
    • Gain practical peacebuilding skills through USIP’s online courses, available tuition-free on our Global Campus platform.
    • Post messages of peace around your home, school, place of worship or community.
    • Make a personal pledge to be a peacebuilder from now on, by seeking nonviolent ways to manage conflict and by seeking out opportunities to take positive action for peace in your everyday life.
    • Share your action for peace with the hashtag #PeaceDayChallenge!

    Shared Activity

    #PeaceDayChallenge

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