As the coronavirus pandemic causes global disruption, USIP knows what it means to adapt our expertise and resources to match the ever-shifting nature of peacebuilding. Throughout our 35 years, we've helped lead the way on matters of peace and conflict and are committed to making peace possible amid the new reality of COVID-19.

Read stories of resilience from USIP's global network of peacebuilders »

Past Events

Health workers entering the Dharavi slum to conduct contact tracing and quarantining people who came into contact with a coronavirus patient in Mumbai, April 28, 2020. (Atul Loke/The New York Times)

COVID in South Asia: Regional Responses

Recorded June 17, 2020

USIP and experts from Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka discuss states' responses to the coronavirus pandemic across the region and what countries can do to maintain and restore their economies, health systems, and citizens’ trust in elected officials.

People visit a statue of former South African President Nelson Mandela in Pretoria, South Africa. (Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times)

Harnessing Coronavirus for a Peaceful and Prosperous Africa

Recorded May 27, 2020

Representatives of the African Union Commission and the African Diplomatic Corps, and other experts discuss the African Union’s efforts to mobilize the fight against coronavirus while still alleviating threats to human security and international peace. 

A flash mob organized by Mutual-Aid Space, a group organized to help the needy, outside a building the group has occupied in Milan, Saturday, April 25, 2020. (Alessandro Grassani/The New York Times)

People Power in a Pandemic: How Movements are Confronting COVID

Recorded May 19, 2020

Activists and peacebuilders from South Sudan, Syria, and Venezuela discuss how nonviolent movements are confronting and adjusting to their new operating environments, how they are spreading awareness about the virus and safety measures in their communities, and how they envision the post-coronavirus era in their societies.  

The Sino-Korean Friendship Bridge that connects North Korea to China, in Dandong, China. (Lam Yik Fei/The New York Times)

The Impact of Coronavirus on North Korea

Recorded April 14, 2020

View the webcast from USIP's online discussion with experts on the latest information regarding the COVID-19 situation in North Korea, the impact of COVID-19 on North Korea’s isolation vis-à-vis the international sanctions regime, the potential for instability in North Korean society, and the potential for sanctions relief to aid coronavirus response efforts.

Related Publications

Coronavirus Shows Why Libya Needs to Build its Institutions

Coronavirus Shows Why Libya Needs to Build its Institutions

Tuesday, April 14, 2020

By: Nate Wilson

Even before the coronavirus pandemic spread across the globe, Libya’s health system—like many of the country’s institutions—was in crisis. The country’s public health infrastructure has been neglected since the 2011 uprising and even before it was in need of a fundamental overhaul. On top of that, many of the foreign medics in Libya fled following the conflict in 2011 and have not returned.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & GovernanceGlobal Health

 Lucy Kurtzer-Ellenbogen on Israel’s Political Turmoil and the Coronavirus Crisis

Lucy Kurtzer-Ellenbogen on Israel’s Political Turmoil and the Coronavirus Crisis

Thursday, April 9, 2020

By: Lucy Kurtzer-Ellenbogen

After three elections, Israel’s political crisis is reportedly coming to an end. Lucy Kurtzer-Ellenbogen explains that the focus has now shifted to the coronavirus pandemic and its impact on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, saying, “What you do often see in the face of these immediate crises is a lot of banding together and cooperation … the question is how long it holds afterwards.”

Type: Podcast

Conflict Analysis & PreventionGlobal Health

The Coronavirus is a Call To Build Resilience in Fragile States

The Coronavirus is a Call To Build Resilience in Fragile States

Thursday, April 9, 2020

By: Nancy Lindborg

As more developed nations have struggled desperately to contain and manage the COVID-19 pandemic, the specter of the virus rolling through the more fragile countries in the Sahel, Horn of Africa, and parts of the Middle East is a terrifying, slow-motion train wreck with the potential to trigger a devastating multidimensional-tiered health, economic, political, and security crisis. It also provides an urgent call to action to do things differently in fragile states so they can recover better.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Fragility & ResilienceGlobal Health

Venezuela: Could the Coronavirus Threat Be an Opportunity?

Venezuela: Could the Coronavirus Threat Be an Opportunity?

Wednesday, April 8, 2020

By: Keith Mines;  Steve Hege

Helping Venezuela resolve its political crisis will be vital to containing the potentially catastrophic COVID-19 pandemic there. A truce in the country’s power struggle is urgent, and last week’s U.S. proposal for a transitional government offers useful ideas, even for a naturally skeptical governing regime. Advancing them would benefit from mediation, perhaps by the Vatican or the United Nations, and will require cooperation among the major powers—the United States, Russia and China—involved in the crisis. If Venezuelans and outsiders can join against the common human threat of coronavirus, that could lay foundations for an eventual political solution to the decade of turmoil that has brewed the hemisphere’s worst humanitarian disaster.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global HealthMediation, Negotiation & DialoguePeace Processes

View All

Latest Publications

The Bangsamoro Transitional Authority’s Inclusivity Test

The Bangsamoro Transitional Authority’s Inclusivity Test

Tuesday, January 25, 2022

By: Yasmira Moner

One of the key challenges facing the Bangsamoro Transition Authority (BTA) is ensuring that the institutions and laws of the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (BARMM) in the Southern Philippines are inclusive of the extraordinary diversity that characterizes its people. The recent extension of the BTA’s mandate, pushing the BARMM’s first elections from May 2022 to May 2025, raises both opportunities and challenges. 

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Peace ProcessesConflict Analysis & Prevention

After U.S.-Russia Talks, Risk of War in Ukraine Still High

After U.S.-Russia Talks, Risk of War in Ukraine Still High

Friday, January 21, 2022

By: Ambassador William B. Taylor;  Donald N. Jensen, Ph.D.

The risk of a new Russian invasion of Ukraine remains high after today’s meeting in Geneva between Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov. The United States delivered its warning, with European allies, of what Blinken called a “swift, severe and a united response” if the Russian troops massed at Ukraine’s border should attack. But the outcome offered at least a hope of avoiding war as Blinken agreed to offer a set of “written comments” to Russia next week on its demand for “security guarantees” that include barring Ukraine from ever joining NATO — a demand that Ukraine, NATO and the United States reject.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

After the Taliban’s Takeover: Pakistan’s TTP problem

After the Taliban’s Takeover: Pakistan’s TTP problem

Wednesday, January 19, 2022

By: Asfandyar Mir, Ph.D.

In 2021, the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) insurgency escalated its challenge against Pakistan. Operating from bases in Afghanistan, and with a growing presence inside Pakistan, the group mounted an increasing number of attacks against Pakistani security forces — as well as against some critical Chinese interests in Pakistan. The insurgency also showed renewed political strength by bringing in splintered factions and improving internal cohesion. Additionally, al-Qaeda signaled its continued alliance with the TTP. On Tuesday, after an attack by the TTP on the police in Pakistan’s capital city of Islamabad, Pakistan’s Interior Minister warned that more attacks by the group are likely.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Conflict Analysis & PreventionViolent Extremism

Despite High Stakes in Ethiopia, China Sits on the Sidelines of Peace Efforts

Despite High Stakes in Ethiopia, China Sits on the Sidelines of Peace Efforts

Wednesday, January 19, 2022

By: Joseph Sany, Ph.D.;  Thomas P. Sheehy

Since November of 2020, Ethiopia has been suffering from a deadly internal conflict that has claimed an estimated 50,000 lives and displaced over two million. The United States, the African Union and others in the region have attempted to secure a cease-fire between the federal government and the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) but have made little headway. In contrast, China has remained mainly on the sidelines of peacebuilding efforts even though Ethiopia — the second most populous country in Africa — is a centerpiece of its Africa policy. 

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global PolicyPeace Processes

View All Publications