Error message

George E. Moose, vice chairman, was a career member of the U.S. Foreign Service, where he attained the rank of career ambassador. His service with the U.S. State Department included assignments in Asia, Africa, the Caribbean and Europe. He held appointments as U.S. ambassador to the Republic of Benin (1983-86) and to the Republic of Senegal (1988-91). From 1991 to 1992, he was U.S. alternate representative to the United Nations Security Council. In 1993, he was appointed assistant secretary of state for African Affairs, a position he occupied until August 1997. From 1998 to 2001, he was U.S. permanent representative to the European Office of the United Nations in Geneva. In June 2007, he was appointed by the White House to the board of directors of the U.S. Institute of Peace, where he now serves as vice chair. He also serves on the boards of Search for Common Ground, the Atlantic Council and Elderhostel. Since 2003, he has been adjunct professor of practice at the Elliott School of International Affairs at The George Washington University. Moose has a bachelor's degree in American studies from Grinnell College, which also awarded him an honorary doctorate of laws. He is married to Judith Kaufmann, a former member of the U.S. Foreign Service and a currently a consultant on international health diplomacy.

Congressional Testimony:

Publications By George

Crucial U.N. Peacekeeping Is Stretched to 'Absolute Limits'

Crucial U.N. Peacekeeping Is Stretched to 'Absolute Limits'

Thursday, June 11, 2015

By: George E. Moose

The alarming state of the overtaxed United Nations peacekeeping system endangers human rights, genocide prevention, development and the prospects for sustainable peace, USIP board Vice Chairman George Moose told an audience June 5 at the annual membership meeting of the United Nations Association of the National Capital Area.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Education & Training; Human Rights; Global Policy

U.S.-Africa Summit: To Spur Growth, Address Violence and Governance

U.S.-Africa Summit: To Spur Growth, Address Violence and Governance

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

By: George E. Moose

The high-profile U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit in Washington this week is an opportunity not to be missed. Fifty leaders of African nations are convening in with President Barack Obama in a demonstration of America’s commitment to Africa’s own priorities for economic growth, security and democratic development. The U.S. can draw on Africa’s impressive progress and its enormous potential by jointly developing an all-embracing strategy to confront the continent’s central challenges: violence and institutional weakness.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Economics & Environment

View All