Error message

After heavy U.S. investment in Pakistan’s defense forces since 9/11, there is growing interest in the state of the broader security sector in Pakistan. A panel of distinguished experts discussed the challenges impeding security sector reform in Pakistan and the implications for the region.

Read the event analysis, Who Controls Pakistan's Security Forces?

After heavy U.S. investment in Pakistan’s defense forces since 9/11, there is growing interest in the state of the broader security sector in Pakistan. Civilian oversight is weak as the military exercises an outsized influence over domestic and foreign policy, hampering democratic governance. A panel of distinguished experts discussed the challenges impeding security sector reform in Pakistan and the implications for the region.

Watch CSPAN's video recording of this event

Speakers

  • Hassan Abbas, Panelist
    Quaid-i-Azam Professor, South Asia Institute, Columbia University
  • Shuja Nawaz, Panelist
    Director, South Asia Center, The Atlantic Council
  • Moeed Yusuf, Panelist
    South Asia Adviser, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Robert Perito, Moderator
    Director, Security Sector Governance Center, U.S. Institute of Peace

Explore Further

If you are interested in this event, you may also be interested in the following Academy courses:

 

Related Publications

Mapping Conflict Trends in Pakistan

Mapping Conflict Trends in Pakistan

Friday, February 7, 2014

By: Saira Yamin; Salma Malik

Over the past decade, violence has become endemic in many parts of Pakistan. This report examines the trajectory of violence and the range of conflicts in six troubled regions. The authors conclude that if existing socioeconomic conditions persist and the state continues to fail to deliver public services, justice, and security, Pakistan could face further escalation of violence and lawlessness.

NGOs and Nonstate Armed Actors

NGOs and Nonstate Armed Actors

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

By: Claudia Hofmann; Ulrich Schneckener

Two seasoned NGOs engage nonstate combatants on international human rights law to get them to change behaviors, from eliminating use of landmines to protecting civilians. Their work can inform and complement other attempts at engagement.

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

View All Publications