After heavy U.S. investment in Pakistan’s defense forces since 9/11, there is growing interest in the state of the broader security sector in Pakistan. A panel of distinguished experts discussed the challenges impeding security sector reform in Pakistan and the implications for the region.

Read the event analysis, Who Controls Pakistan's Security Forces?

After heavy U.S. investment in Pakistan’s defense forces since 9/11, there is growing interest in the state of the broader security sector in Pakistan. Civilian oversight is weak as the military exercises an outsized influence over domestic and foreign policy, hampering democratic governance. A panel of distinguished experts discussed the challenges impeding security sector reform in Pakistan and the implications for the region.

Watch CSPAN's video recording of this event

Speakers

  • Hassan Abbas, Panelist
    Quaid-i-Azam Professor, South Asia Institute, Columbia University
  • Shuja Nawaz, Panelist
    Director, South Asia Center, The Atlantic Council
  • Moeed Yusuf, Panelist
    South Asia Adviser, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Robert Perito, Moderator
    Director, Security Sector Governance Center, U.S. Institute of Peace

Explore Further

If you are interested in this event, you may also be interested in the following Academy courses:

 

Related Publications

What’s at Stake in Pakistan’s Summer Elections?

What’s at Stake in Pakistan’s Summer Elections?

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

By: Colin Cookman

Later this summer, millions of Pakistani voters will have the opportunity to cast ballots to elect new representatives for the national parliament and provincial assemblies. Pakistan’s political landscape is fractious and has faced major upheavals in the year running up to the vote, leaving considerable uncertainty about the possible outcomes.

Democracy & Governance

Could Pakistan’s Protests Undercut Taliban and Extremism?

Could Pakistan’s Protests Undercut Taliban and Extremism?

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

By: James Rupert

Tens of thousands of ethnic Pashtuns have held mass protests in Pakistan in the past three months, demanding justice and better governance for their communities. The largely youth-led protests forged an organization, the Pashtun Tahafuz Movement (“tahafuz” means “protection”), that has broadened its goals to include democracy and decentralization of power in Pakistan. The movement reflects demands for change among the roughly 30 million Pashtuns who form about 15 percent of Pakistan’s population, the country’s second-largest ethnic community.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Nonviolent Action; Violent Extremism

View All Publications