After heavy U.S. investment in Pakistan’s defense forces since 9/11, there is growing interest in the state of the broader security sector in Pakistan. A panel of distinguished experts discussed the challenges impeding security sector reform in Pakistan and the implications for the region.

Read the event analysis, Who Controls Pakistan's Security Forces?

After heavy U.S. investment in Pakistan’s defense forces since 9/11, there is growing interest in the state of the broader security sector in Pakistan. Civilian oversight is weak as the military exercises an outsized influence over domestic and foreign policy, hampering democratic governance. A panel of distinguished experts discussed the challenges impeding security sector reform in Pakistan and the implications for the region.

Watch CSPAN's video recording of this event

Speakers

  • Hassan Abbas, Panelist
    Quaid-i-Azam Professor, South Asia Institute, Columbia University
  • Shuja Nawaz, Panelist
    Director, South Asia Center, The Atlantic Council
  • Moeed Yusuf, Panelist
    South Asia Adviser, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Robert Perito, Moderator
    Director, Security Sector Governance Center, U.S. Institute of Peace

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