The WJP Rule of Law Index® 2019 is the latest report in an annual series measuring the rule of law based on the experiences and perceptions of the general public and in-country experts worldwide. The findings from the index are critical for policymakers and practitioners interested in harnessing comprehensive and rigorous data to refine their understanding of challenges ahead and develop effective strategies to improve the rule of law worldwide.

The scores and rankings for the Index are derived from more than 120,000 household surveys and 3,800 expert surveys in 126 countries and jurisdictions. The Index is the most comprehensive data set of its kind and is the world’s leading source for original data on the rule of law.

Effective rule of law reduces corruption, combats poverty and disease, and protects people from injustices large and small. It is the foundation for communities of justice, opportunity, and peace—underpinning development, accountable government, and respect for fundamental rights. 

Featuring current, independent data, the WJP Rule of Law Index measures how the rule of law is experienced and perceived in practical, everyday situations by the general public worldwide. At this launch event, WJP’s chief research officer will review key insights and data trends from the 2019 report across the index’s eight factors. Following presentation of the key findings, a panel will discuss the drivers behind the key trends and their policy implications.

Join us to discuss key findings from the WJP Rule of Law Index 2019 and how the rule of law matters for the future of fair and functioning societies worldwide. Take part in the conversation on Twitter with #ROLIndex.

Speakers   

Bill Taylor, welcoming remarks
Executive Vice President, U.S. Institute of Peace

William Hubbard, welcoming remarks
Board Chair, World Justice Project 

Elizabeth Andersen
Executive Director, World Justice Project

Dr. Alejandro Ponce
Chief Research Officer, World Justice Project

Maria Stephan
Director Nonviolent Action, U.S. Institute of Peace

Hoyt Yee
Senior Fellow, U.S. Institute of Peace

Philippe Leroux-Martin, moderator
Director Governance Justice and Security, U.S. Institute of Peace

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