The U.S. Institute of Peace is pleased to have welcomed The Right Honourable Jeremy Hunt MP on the occasion of his first visit to Washington D.C. as British foreign secretary.

Amid unprecedented challenges to the postwar order, the U.S.-U.K. special relationship is critical to upholding democracy and the rule of law and promoting international peace and stability. At USIP—a U.S. national institute dedicated to preventing violent conflict and building peace around the world—the foreign secretary spoke about the challenges currently being presented to the rules-based international order and how the U.K. will work in partnership with other like-minded countries around the world to address them.

The Rt Hon Jeremy Hunt MP
Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs
@Jeremy_Hunt

Ambassador William Taylormoderator
Executive Vice President, U.S. Institute of Peace

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