Discussions about how to resolve the conflict in Ukraine too often occur with limited knowledge of the views of Ukrainians, and yet they will be key to determining whether any particular resolution can last. Should the war-torn East have autonomy? Should Ukraine move toward the EU and NATO or closer to Russia? Should the U.S. provide weapons to the Kyiv government? The results of a new, comprehensive survey of Ukrainians, including those in the East, were revealed before a discussion of the findings on Monday, March 9, at the U.S. Institute of Peace.

20130309-Ukraine-Poll-event.jpg

The survey of 2,000 Ukrainians, led by political psychologist Dr. Steven Kull at the University of Maryland and administered by the Kyiv International Institute of Sociology, was conducted Feb. 13-22, beginning one day after the latest ceasefire was to take effect and spanning the fall of Dabaltseve to Russian-backed separatists. Conducted primarily through face-to-face interviews (telephone was used in some of the conflict areas), the poll also queries Ukrainians on how they think the United States, Russia, Germany, France and the EU are handling the crisis.  

Kull is director of the University-affiliated Program for Public Consultation, which develops methods for enhancing the capacity of governments to consult their publics on policy decisions. He also is Senior Research Scholar at the University’s Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland (CISSM). Dr. Kull plays a central role in the BBC World Service global poll, and regularly briefs members of the U.S. Congress as well as officials of the State Department, the United Nations, and the European Commission.

Continue the conversation on Twitter with #UkrainePoll.

Speakers

Dr. Steven Kull
Director, Program for Public Consultation, and Senior Research Scholar, Center for International and Security Studies at the University of Maryland

Dr. Catherine McArdle Kelleher
College Park Professor, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland and former U.S. Secretary of Defense Representative to NATO

Amb. William B. Taylor
Acting Executive Vice President for USIP and former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine

Christian Caryl, Moderator
Contributing Editor, Foreign Policy

Related Publications

Why Have the Wars in Afghanistan and Ukraine Played Out So Differently?

Why Have the Wars in Afghanistan and Ukraine Played Out So Differently?

Thursday, June 23, 2022

By: William Byrd, Ph.D.

The Taliban insurgency and U.S. troop withdrawal, and Russian incursions culminating in the February 24 invasion, constituted existential “stress tests” for Afghanistan and Ukraine, respectively. Ukraine and its international supporters have succeeded in preventing an outright Russian victory, imposing severe and continuing costs on Russia — ranging from high casualties to financial sanctions. Whatever happens next, the invasion has solidified Ukraine’s national will, status and orientation as an independent, Western-oriented sovereign country. In sharp contrast, Afghanistan’s government and security forces collapsed within a month after U.S. troops left the country, its president and many others fled, and the Taliban rapidly took over.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

Another Way to Help Ukraine: Prepare Now for a Peace Process

Another Way to Help Ukraine: Prepare Now for a Peace Process

Thursday, June 16, 2022

By: Juan Diaz-Prinz, Ph.D.

Three months of Russia’s savagery against Ukraine have left little space in current policy discussions for considering a peace process. President Biden vows to strengthen Ukraine before any negotiations by providing more arms and funds, and tougher sanctions on Russia. Alongside that vital support for Ukraine’s defense, it is important to develop other ways to help Ukraine end bloodshed and protect its future. One track of policy should be preparation now for negotiations if that opportunity emerges.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Peace Processes

Ukraine: How to Oppose Russia’s Weaponization of Corruption

Ukraine: How to Oppose Russia’s Weaponization of Corruption

Thursday, June 9, 2022

By: James Rupert

Fifteen weeks of Ukrainians’ staunch resistance to Russia’s invasion has created an opportunity to weaken one of Russia’s main weapons to undermine democracy and stability in other countries, according to Eka Tkeshelashvili, a former foreign minister of Georgia. As democracies bolster Ukraine’s defense, they also should step up support for Ukraine to root out the corruption in business and government that has long been Russian President Vladimir Putin’s primary method to cripple the independence of Russia’s neighbors. One impact of the war will be to create a stronger political base for throttling corruption in Ukraine, Tkeshelashvili said.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & GovernanceGlobal Policy

View All Publications