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Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi visited Washington to meet with President Donald Trump, as the new administration reviewed its strategy against the ISIS extremist group and debate intensified at home about the future of Iraq after the battle to recapture Mosul.

The prime minister’s Washington visit also coincided with a two-day meeting hosted by Secretary of State Rex Tillerson on March 22-23 that gathered representatives from the 68 nations and international organizations in the Global Coalition to Counter ISIS.

At USIP, the prime minister made remarks and participated in a discussion, with questions from an invited audience, moderated by USIP President Nancy Lindborg. Follow the conversation on Twitter with #AbadiUSIP

Read the full transcript of the Prime Minister's remarks and his conversation with Nancy Lindborg.

Speakers

Nancy Lindborg
President, U.S. Institute of Peace

H.E. Haider al-Abadi
Prime Minister, Republic of Iraq

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