The U.S. Institute of Peace is closely monitoring the evolving situation with the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). In practicing prevention in consideration of our team and guests, we changed the format for this event to webcast-only.

As we enter a new decade, troubling developments around the rule of law continue to raise concerns for the future of fair and functioning societies. Since 2009, the World Justice Project (WJP) has documented these trends in its annual WJP Rule of Law Index, now covering 128 countries and jurisdictions in the new 2020 edition. Based on more than 130,000 household surveys and 4,000 legal practitioner and expert surveys worldwide,the 2020 Index provides citizens, governments, donors, businesses, and civil society organizations around the world with a comprehensive comparative analysis of countries’ adherence to universal rule of law principles.

On March 11, USIP and the World Justice Project (WJP) delved into the findings from the WJP Rule of Law Index 2020. WJP’s chief research officer reviewed important insights and data trends from the report. This was followed by a panel discussion on the underlying factors behind the results, as well as the policy implications for those invested in strengthening the rule of law. 

Continue the conversation on Twitter with #ROLIndex.

Speakers

Welcoming Remarks

  • David Yang
    Vice President, Applied Conflict Transformation, U.S. Institute of Peace

Remarks

  • Ted Piccone
    Chief Engagement Officer, World Justice Project

Keynote Address

  • Joe Foti
    Chief Research Officer, Open Government Partnership

Overview of Rule of Law Index 2020 Key Findings

  • Alejandro Ponce
    Chief Research Officer, World Justice Project

Panel Discussion

  • Philippe Leroux-Martin
    Director, Governance, Justice & Security, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Maria Stephan
    Director of Nonviolent Action, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Margaret Lewis
    Professor of Law, Seton Hall University
  • Elizabeth Andersen
    Executive Director, World Justice Project

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