In the face of complex global security issues that directly challenge the U.S. role in the global order, the U.S. Department of State is providing unparalleled technical security assistance — including arms, training and support — to meet partners' needs and prevent malign actors from challenging their countries’ sovereignty. Yet, the question remains: Beyond supplying critical equipment, how can effective governance improve security sector assistance, and how can the United States ensure the effective allocation of these resources? 

On February 13, USIP hosted a discussion with U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Jessica Lewis on the future of security sector governance and how the United States works to improve partner transparency, accountability and oversight in its security sector assistance. The conversation centered around the challenges posed by corrupt security services in regions with weakened democratic governance, the need for deeper integration with partner nations’ civil society actors, and the importance of advocating for civilian harm mitigation in conflict zones.

Continue the conversation on social media using the hashtag #FutureSSG.

Speakers

Jessica Lewis
Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Political-Military Affairs, U.S. Department of State

Lise Grande, moderator 
President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

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