USIP, the Atlantic Council, the Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security, the Sisterhood is Global Institute and the U.S Department of State joined to launch the U.S.-Afghan Consultative Mechanism (USACM). U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken provided remarks, and U.S. Special Envoy for Afghan Women, Girls, and Human Rights Rina Amiri moderated a discussion with representatives of the USACM platform.

English

Dari

Since the Taliban takeover last August, Afghan women, girls, journalists and at-risk ethnic and religious communities have seen the rapid erosion of their human rights. In a welcome response, forums designed to bring these vital Afghan voices into international policymaking are expanding globally. To coordinate and deepen these populations’ engagement with U.S. government officials, the four aforementioned forums of Afghan stakeholders are coming together with the U.S Department of State to form the USACM.

Comprised of a diverse set of representatives from various Afghan women’s coalitions, as well as civil society leaders, journalists, academics and religious scholars from inside and outside Afghanistan, the USACM will facilitate regular engagement with the U.S. government on issues ranging from human rights documentation to women in Islam. 

Join the conversation on Twitter using #AfghanWomen.

Participants

Antony J. Blinken, keynote remarks
U.S. Secretary of State

Rina Amiri, moderator
U.S. Special Envoy for Afghan Women, Girls, and Human Rights

Lise Grande, welcoming remarks
President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

Palwasha Hassan
Senior Fellow, Institute for Women, Peace and Security, Georgetown University;
Founding Member, Afghan Women’s Network

Naheed Sarabi
Visiting Fellow, Center for Sustainable Development, the Brookings Institution

Asila Wardak
Senior Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University; Founding Member of the Women’s Forum on Afghanistan

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