With more than 100 million people, Ethiopia is one of Africa’s most important and populous countries.  It’s also unusual: Ethiopia is Africa’s only explicitly ethnically federal state. But amid opening political space and historic national reforms, this model of federalism is coming under strain and the country’s broader national stability is being tested. How ethnic federalism endures, or is discarded, will be a critical question for the future peace and prosperity of the country.

During this crucial period of reform and uncertainty in Ethiopia, an expert panel at the U.S. Institute of Peace discussed the origins and evolution of Ethiopia’s system of ethnic federalism, and the possible future of this unique governance model. Continue the conversation with #AChangingEthiopia.

Speakers

Alemayehu Weldemariam 

Dr. Yohannes Gedamu
Lecturer, Political Science, Georgia Gwinnett College

Dr. Daniel Mains
Associate Professor of Anthropology and African Studies, Oklahoma University

Aly Verjee, moderator
Senior Advisor, Africa Program, U.S. Institute of Peace

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